The Furniture Shoppe VIP Reception Has Guest Sarah Lanigan Thursday

Monday, March 17, 2014

The Furniture Shoppee will host A Night At The Stickley Museum Thursday beginning at 5 p.m. with a wine and cheese reception until 6:30 p.m. when Sarah Lanigan will speak. 

Carter Fowler, general manager, and the staff at The Furniture Shoppe invite the public to attend a look into one of America’s most legendary furniture companies with Ms. Lanigan, curator and director of The Stickley Furniture Museum in Fayetteville, New York. Images, anecdotes and historical tidbits normally reserved for tour groups and visitors to the museum will come alive in this presentation.

There will be door prizes including a drawing for a Harvey Ellis Jewelry Box held at 7:30 p.m. when the presentation concludes.  

“So rarely does a curator venture out and leave the walls of the building they oversee and care for,” said John Kotsianas, territory manager for Tennessee based L & JG Stickley, “I am so pleased to have Sarah coming to visit our Chattanooga Stickley enthusiasts and the Fowler family at The Furniture Shoppe. I have had the privilege of walking through the Stickley Museum in Fayetteville New York with Sarah on several occasions. She has wonderful stories and insight on the history of Stickley, one of the oldest and most unique American furniture manufacturers remaining in the United States today.” 

Ms. Lanigan has been the executive director of The Stickley Museum in Fayetteville, New York since 2011. Since that time Ms. Lanigan has overseen the design and reinstallation of the museum’s storage areas for European and American furniture and has traveled nationally to lecture on Stickley history and craftsmanship.  She is a board member of the Arts & Crafts Society of Central New York. Lanigan is a native of Rochester, New York and holds masters degrees in Museum Studies and Art History from Syracuse University. 

The Stickley Museum in Fayetteville, New York is located in what was the original L&JG Stickley factory, and was officially opened in 2007. Since this time the facility has attracted enthusiasts from across the U.S.A., Canada, France, Germany and England. 

The 110 plus year old L&JG Stickley Company has been widely known for manufacturing Arts & Crafts Mission style furniture, including the historical 220 Prairie settle and 406 Morris chair.  
“Upon arriving and touring the Stickley Museum you will find antiques dating back over 200 years, as many of the items on display were originally owned by Leopold Stickley,” said Mr. Fowler, 5th generation manager of the Fowler Brothers Co. organization. “What makes this event with Sarah Lanigan so special and rare is the simple fact that she doesn’t usually travel and get the opportunity to share the history of this furniture manufacturing legend.  Being in business for over 128 years, we serve Chattanooga with only the best furniture and Stickley is the best of the best.  We have been a proud Stickley dealer for over 25 years and we are very excited to have Sarah share her fresh perspective on the History of Stickley Furniture with our Chattanooga community.” 

Mr. Fowler said, “We spent a lot of time earlier this year renovating our showrooms to offer the best selection of luxurious, quality furniture to suit every style and taste. Extra discounts and Bonus Checks with additional savings will be available during this 
VIP sale.”  

The Furniture Shoppe is at I-24, 4th Avenue Exit 181 493-7630. For additional information, please visit TheFurnitureShoppe.NET



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