Fish And Wildlife Service Conducts 5-Year Status Reviews Of 33 Southeastern Species

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of 25 endangeredand eight threatened species occurring in one or more of the 10 states in the Southeast and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.  The public is invited to provide written information and comments concerning these species on or before May 27.

These five-year reviews will ensure listing classifications under the Endangered Species Act are accurate.  In addition to reviewing the classification of these species, a five--year review presents an opportunity to track the species’ recovery progress.  It may benefit species by providing valuable information to guide future conservation efforts.  Information gathered during a review can assist in making funding decisions, consideration related to reclassifying species status, conducting interagency consultations, making permitting decisions, and determining whether to update recovery plans, and other actions under the ESA.

This notice announces a review of 25 species currently listed as endangered: Anastasia Island beach mouse, Perdido Key beach mouse, southeastern beach mouse, Puerto Rican parrot, Cumberland elktoe, Appalachian elktoe, yellow blossom, southern combshell, green blossom, tubercled blossom, speckled pocketbook, black clubshell, flat pigtoe, heavy pigtoe, stirrupshell, Alabama cave shrimpplicate rocksnailflat pebblesnailcylindrical lioplaxgolden sedge, Etonia rosemary, Rugel’s pawpaw, longspurred mint, Canby’s dropwort, and Shorts goldenrod.  

This notice also announces the service’s review of eight species currently listed as threatened: painted snake coiled forest snail, lacy elimia, round rocksnail, painted rocksnailFlorida bonamia, scrub buckwheat, telephus spurge, and Miccosukee gooseberry.

Specifically, this review seeks information on: (1) species biology, including population trends, distribution, abundance, demographics, and genetics; (2) habitat conditions, including amount, distribution, and suitability; (3) conservation measures that have been implemented; (4) threat status and trends; and, (5) other new information, data, or corrections, including taxonomic or nomenclatural changes; identification of erroneous information contained in the ESA list; and improved analytical methods.  Comments and materials received will be available for public inspection by appointment.

The Federal Register notice announcing the status review of these 35 federally listed species is available on-line at https://federalregister.gov/a2014-06502

Written comments and information on the specific species may be e-mailed, faxed, or sent via regular mail to:   

  • Anastasia Island beach mouse and southeastern beach mouse:  North Florida Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 7915 Baymeadows Way, Suite 200, Jacksonville, FL 32256, fax 904-731-3045.  For information on this species, contact Bill Brooks at the Ecological Services Field Office (904-731-3136bill_brooks@fws.gov). 
  • Perdido Key beach mouse Panama City Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1601 Balboa Ave., Panama City, FL 32405, fax 850-763-2177.  For information on this species, contact Kristi Yanchis at the Ecological Services Field Office (850-769-0552 ext 252Kristi_Yanchis@fws.gov). 
  • Puerto Rican parrot Caribbean Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Garcia de la Noceda Street, Local 38, 1600, Rio Grande, PR 00745, fax 787-887-7512.  For information on this species, contact Marisel Lopez at the Ecological Services Field Office (787-887-8769, ext 224marisel_lopez@fws.gov). 
  • Cumberland elktoe:  Tennessee Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 446 Neal Street, Cookeville, TN 38501, fax 931-528-7075.  For information on this species, contact Stephanie Chance at the Ecological Services Field Office (931-528-6481, ext 211stephanie_chance@fws.gov). 
  • Appalachian elktoe:  Asheville Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 160 Zillicoa Street, Asheville, NC 28801, fax 828-258-5330.  For information on this species, contact John Fridell at the Ecological Services Field Office(828-258-3939, ext 225john_fridell@fws.gov). 
  • Southern combshell, black clubshell, flat pigtoe, heavy pigtoe, and stirrupshell:  Mississippi Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 6578 Dogwood View Parkway, Jackson, MS 39213, fax 601-965-4340.  For information on this species, contact Paul Hartfield at the Ecological Services Field Office (601-321-1125, paul_hartfield @fws.gov)
  • Speckled pocketbook:  Arkansas Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 110 South Amity Road, Suite 300, Conway, AR 72032, fax 501-513-4480.  For information on this species, contact Chris Davidson at the Endangered Species of the Ecological Services Field Office (501-513-4481chris_davidson@fws.gov)
  • Yellow blossom, green blossom, tubercled blossom:  Tennessee Ecological Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 446 Neal Street, Cookeville, TN 38501, fax 931-528-7075.  For information on this species, contact Peggy Shute at the Ecological Services Field Office (501-528-6481peggy_shute@fws.gov).
  • Alabama cave shrimp, plicate rocksnail, flat pebblesnail, cylindrical lioplax, lacy elimia, round rocksnail, painted rocksnail:  Alabama Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1208-B Main Street, Daphne, AL 36526, fax 251-441-6222.  For information on this species, contact Jeff Powell at the Ecological Services  Field Office (251-441-5181,jeff_powell@fws.gov). 
  • Painted snake coiled forest snail:  Tennessee Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 446 Neal Street, Cookeville, TN 38501, fax 931-528-7075.  For information on this species, contact Geoff Call at the Ecological Services  Field Office (931-525-4983, geoff_call @fws.gov). 
  • Golden sedge:  Raleigh Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 551-F Pylon Drive, Raleigh, NC 27606, fax 919-856-4556.  For information on this species, contact Dale Suiter at the Ecological Services Field Office (919-856-4520,dale_suiter@fws.gov). 
  • Etonia rosemary, Florida bonamia, scrub buckwheat, longspurred mint, and Rugel’s pawpaw:  North Florida Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 7915 Baymeadows Way, Suite 200, Jacksonville, FL 32256, fax 904-731-3045.  For information on this species, contact Todd Mecklenborg at the Ecological Services Field Office (727-892-4104,todd_mecklenborg@fws.gov). 
  • Canby’s dropwort Charleston Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 176 Croghan Spur Road, Suite 200, Charleston, SC 29407, fax 843-727-4218.  For information on this species, contact Jason Ayers at the Ecological Services Field Office (843-300-0431, jason_ayers@fws.gov). 
  • Short’s goldenrod:  Kentucky Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 330 West Broadway, Suite 365, Frankfort, KY 40601, fax 502-695-1024.  For information on this species, contact Mike Floyd at the Ecological Services  Field Office (502-695-0468, mike_floyd@fws.gov). 
  • Miccosukee gooseberry and Telephus spurge: Panama City Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1601 Balboa Ave., Panama City, FL 32405, fax 850-763-2177.  For information on this species, contact Vivian Negron-Ortiz at the Ecological Services Field Office (850-769-0552, ext 231, Vivian_negronortiz@fws.gov). 

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