Red Hare Launches Its Beer In Chattanooga

Tuesday, March 4, 2014

Georgia's Red Hare Brewing Company will now be expanding its distribution to Chattanooga and Nashville. 

Red Hare will be selling its award winning Long Day Lager, Gangway IPA and Watership Brown Ale, along with the Seasonal Line and Rabbit’s Reserve series in the greater Chattanooga area beginning in March. The micro-brews will be available in kegs as well as in cans, recognizable by their iconic red hare on the labels. 

“We were getting lots of requests from people in Chattanooga who had visited our brewery off the I-75, so Chattanooga is a natural choice as it is the closest city north of us with a big appetite for craft beer” says owner Roger Davis. 

Red Hare Brewing Company is an independent microbrewery located in Marietta, just outside of Atlanta. Red Hare opened over two years ago and has expanded rapidly in the state of Georgia. Red Hare was the first craft brewery in Georgia to can its beer and to introduce a craft lager. Its three-year round varieties are Long Day Lager, Gangway IPA, and Watership Brown. Red Hare also brews a variety of unique seasonal craft flavors and small batches called the Rabbit’s Reserve series.   

The Marietta brewery tasting room is off I-75, 100 miles south of Chattanooga and is open to the public for sampling and tours Thursdays and Fridays from 5:30-7:30 p.m. and Saturday from 2-4 p.m.

For more information visit www.redharebrewing.com, contact the brewery by e-mail at info@redharebrewing.com, or by phone at 678.401-0600.  Red Hare is at 1998 Delk Industrial Blvd, Marietta, GA 30067. 



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