Spending Associated With GNTC Has $68,963,126 Impact In Region

Thursday, March 06, 2014

Dr. Jeffrey M. Humphreys, director of the Selig Center for Economic Growth at the University of Georgia’s Terry College of Business, says the area served by Georgia Northwestern Technical College benefits economically from spending that is either directory or indirectly related to the college, adds up to $68,963,126. 

The economic impact is in a new report from Dr. Humphreys that details his analysis of economic data from the Technical College System of Georgia for the 2012 fiscal year. 

The study also found that the college’s spending results in 886 public and private sector jobs. Drd. Humphreys reported that statewide, for each job created on a TCSG college campus, one off-campus job exists because of college-related expenditures.  One in every 264 nonfarm jobs in Georgia, he said, occurs because of spending associated with a TCSG college. 

"The fundamental finding is that each of the TCSG colleges, including GNTC, creates substantial economic impacts in terms of output, value added, labor income, and employment," said Dr. Humphreys.  "These economic impacts demonstrate that continued emphasis on technical colleges as an enduring pillar of the regional economy translates into jobs, higher incomes, and greater production of goods and services for local households and businesses.” 

The TCSG commissioned Dr. Humphreys to calculate the importance that spending connected to the state’s technical colleges has for their service delivery areas, which range in size from two to 11 counties.  Georgia Northwestern serves Catoosa, Chattooga, Dade, Floyd, Gordon, Murray, Polk, Walker, and Whitfield counties in Georgia with campuses located in Floyd, Gordon, Polk, Walker, and Whitfield counties. Several categories of college expenditures were reviewed for the study, including personnel salaries and fringe benefits, college operations, capital construction projects, and student spending, to name a few. 

The result, put in the context of the taxpayer investment, indicated that the $16,322,941 state appropriation for GNTC in 2012 supported the enrollment of 8,822 students, generated $68,963,126 in local spending, and helped to sustain 886 college-related jobs. 

GNTC President Pete McDonald is pleased with the results of the study.  “The study reinforces the positive economic impact that Georgia Northwestern Technical College has on the communities we serve.  The excellent faculty and staff we have at Georgia Northwestern play an important role in helping our students achieve successful careers." 

Statewide, the $315 million state appropriation for the TCSG in 2012 helped to train almost 153,000 technical college students, contributed to $1.2 billion in direct and indirect spending in communities throughout Georgia, and was a factor in almost 15,000 public and private sector jobs. 

“The spending factor alone is a sizable return on the state’s investment in the TCSG, and it would be significantly higher if we were to add the economic value that our graduates create once they leave college and meet employers’ needs for a skilled workforce,” said Ron Jackson, commissioner of the TCSG. 

The study did not attempt to measure the value in terms of the increased earnings of TCSG graduates or the colleges’ role in helping the state to attract and retain companies with high-skill, good-paying jobs.  Nor did it calculate the impact of the TCSG’s Quick Start program, a state economic development incentive that provides customized training free of charge to new and expanding businesses. 

The full report, The Economic Impact of Technical College System of Georgia Institutions on their Service Delivery Area Economies in FY 2012, is available online at https://tcsg.edu/download/TCSG_Impact_2012_Economic_Activity_1.2014.pdf 

The following is a list of the 24 TCSG colleges and their economic and employment impact on their service delivery areas in 2012.  For a map of the colleges’ service delivery areas go to https://tcsg.edu/tech_map.php

TCSG College

 Economic

Impact of

 FY2012

Spending

 

Employment Impact of FY2012 Spending (College-Related Jobs)

Albany Technical College

$47,378,544

552

Altamaha Technical College

$20,410,617

274

Athens Technical College

$46,716,956

608

Atlanta Technical College

$63,965,060

692

Augusta Technical College

$54,380,987

699

Central Georgia Technical College *

$64,673,414

873

Chattahoochee Technical College

$104,722,504

1,288

Columbus Technical College

$38,156,614

479

Georgia Northwestern Technical College

$68,963,126

886

Georgia Piedmont Technical College

$59,595,578

773

Gwinnett Technical College

$71,377,444

768

Lanier Technical College

$40,741,923

515

Middle Georgia Technical College *

$30,906,755

412

Moultrie Technical College

$26,095,668

371

North Georgia Technical College

$35,266,872

452

Oconee Fall Line Technical College

$30,382,428

442

Ogeechee Technical College

$29,515,195

393

Okefenokee Technical College

$17,807,595

233

Savannah Technical College

$56,935,335

707

South Georgia Technical College

$27,530,288

366

Southeastern Technical College

$30,469,358

402

Southern Crescent Technical College

$71,997,872

881

Southwest Georgia Technical College

$21,371,303

265

West Georgia Technical College

$65,357,646

911

Wiregrass Georgia Technical College

 $55,199,383

757

TCSG System Total

 $1,179,918,464

14,997

*colleges merged as the new Central Georgia Technical College in July 2013

 

 


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