Author Wes Moore Speaks In Chattanooga March 18

Friday, March 7, 2014

The Memphis office of the international nonprofit organization Facing History and Ourselves, in partnership with The Allstate Foundation, will host a free Community Conversation with New York Times bestselling author Wes Moore. His book, The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates, shares the true story of two kids with the same name living in the same city. Moore grew up to be a Rhodes Scholar, decorated combat veteran, White House Fellow, and business leader while the other Wes Moore is currently serving a life sentence in prison for felony murder.  

This free event will take place on Tuesday, March 18, from 7-8:30 p.m. at the Chattanooga School for the Arts & Sciences (865 East Third St.). 

Seeking to help other young people to redirect their lives, Mr. Moore is committed to being a positive influence and helping kids find the support they need to enact change. By sharing his own powerful story of resilience and participation, Mr. Moore's work demonstrates the positive impact teachers, mentors, and volunteers who work with youth can have, said officials.

The event is free and open to the public. Seating is limited. To RSVP for the March 18 Community Conversation, call 901.452-1776, or visit facinghistory.org/communityconversations

This event is part of a national series presented by Facing History and Ourselves and The Allstate Foundation. Community Conversations bring prominent authors, scholars, filmmakers, and policy leaders together with audiences across the nation to discuss topics of civic participation, individual and collective responsibility and diversity.  


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