Lee Offers First Archaeology Camp

Friday, March 7, 2014 - by Britain Miethe, Lee University
Pictured here for their “hands-on lesson” are campers Max and Audrey Webb and Luke Wilhelm discovering archaeology with teacher Allie Webb reassembling a broken flower pot.
Pictured here for their “hands-on lesson” are campers Max and Audrey Webb and Luke Wilhelm discovering archaeology with teacher Allie Webb reassembling a broken flower pot.

Lee University is hosting its first archaeology camp this spring. The camp began on March 1 and will run through April 6 at the Archaeology House on Trunk Street. 

The camp is designed for children ages 6-12, but is open to all. Students will learn about the archaeology as a whole, study of other cultures, and get to participate in their own archaeological dig.

Directing the camp are Lee alumna Abbey Thomas and anthropology majors Emma-Leigh Evors and Allie Webb. Multiple volunteers will be assisting with the camp, all who have taken archaeology courses and completed archaeology field school at Lee. 

“These camps are a chance for students and graduates of the anthropology to share their love of the discipline,” said Ms. Thomas. “Through these camps, we hope to give young students an understanding of how archaeologists piece together the story of the past.”

The camp is taking place in two sessions. The first session will end on March 16 and the second session will take place March 22-23 and April 5-6. 

Registration for the second session is open now. The fee is $25 for the camp, which includes all four day sessions.

For more information or to register for the archaeology camp, please email Ms. Thomas at athoma12@leeu.edu or call at 650-0234.


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