Civil War Round Table Meeting April 15

Dalton Author to Speak on Atlanta Battle of Peach Tree Creek

Saturday, April 12, 2014

The Chattanooga Civil War Round Table will hold its regular monthly meeting on Tuesday, April 15, 2014.  The meeting is at 7 PM and will be held in the Millis-Evans Room of Caldwell Hall on the campus  of the The McCallie School (enter the campus from Dodds Avenue and follow the signs to the Academic Quadrangle and Caldwell Hall). 

Dalton Historian, Author, and Attorney Robert D. Jenkins is the speaker.  Historian Jenkins will discuss the July 20, 1864 Battle of Peach Tree Creek outside of Atlanta, the subject of his recently published book The Battle of Peach Tree Creek: Hood's First Sortie, 20 July 1864.  The meeting is free and open to the public.            

The Battle of Peach Tree Creek on July 20, 1864 was the first of the three big Battles for Atlanta 150 years ago this year.  Often overshadowed as part of the larger campaign of which it is a part, Dalton Attorney, Historian, and Author Robert D. Jenkins' recently published book on the subject is the first in-depth look at that engagement.  It was then just-appointed Confederate Army of Tennessee commander John Bell Hood's first attempt to turn the Union armies under William T. Sherman back from the very gates of the Gate City. 

 James Ogden, III, President

Chattanooga Civil War Round Table

 

{The Chattanooga Civil War Round Table is a group of area citizens interested in the study of the American Civil War.  The Round Table meets on the third Tuesday of each month, normally in the Millis-Evans Room of Caldwell Hall on the campus of The McCallie School on Missionary Ridge (enter off Dodds Avenue at Union Street).  At each month’s meeting, a historian or author from the region or from across the nation, or a member, makes a presentation on some aspect of the conflict.  The meetings are free and open to the public and membership in the Round Table is open to all with an interest in the era of the War Between the States.}

 







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