Program on Preserving and Storing Documents at TN State Library May 3

Monday, April 14, 2014

Preserving important family records will be easier than ever for people who attend the next in the Tennessee State Library and Archives' (TSLA) series of workshops. Carol Roberts, conservation manager in TSLA's Preservation Services Section, will host the workshop on basic cleaning, repair and storage techniques people can use to extend the life of important family papers, collections and scrapbooks.

The workshop will be held Saturday, May 3 from 9:30 a.m. until 11 a.m. at the TSLA Auditorium. TSLA's building is located at 403 Seventh Avenue North, directly west of the State Capitol building in downtown Nashville.

"This workshop is a great opportunity for people to learn how to take care of family heirlooms," Secretary of State Tre Hargett said. "It will be time well spent for those who have an interest in maintaining archival collections, but need a little help getting started."

The workshop, sponsored by TSLA Friends, will cap Preservation Week, which runs from April 27 through May 3.

Roberts is active in outreach programs and consults with government and private organizations throughout the state about preservation of archival and library materials and disaster preparedness. She has a bachelor's degree in history from David Lipscomb University and a master's degree in historic preservation from Middle Tennessee State University.

The workshop is free and open to the public. However, due to seating limitations in the auditorium, reservations are required. Patrons can register by telephone at 1-615-741-2764 or by e-mail at workshop.tsla@tn.gov.

A limited amount of parking is available in the front, on the side and behind TSLA's building.



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