Georgia Wildlife License Plates To Support Conservation

Monday, April 14, 2014

Georgia’s five wildlife license plates will soon cost less and provide more support for conserving Georgia wildlife, from bald eagles to bobwhite quail.

Governor Nathan Deal signed House Bill 881 into law on Monday at Jekyll Island.

The legislation rolls back the cost of buying or renewing a wildlife plate to $25 and dedicates more than 75 percent of fees to the Department of Natural Resources’ Wildlife Resources Division programs that depend on them.

Passed in this year’s General Assembly and sponsored by Rep. Bubber Epps (R-Dry Branch) and Sen. Jeff Mullis (R-Chickamauga), the changes are scheduled to take effect July 1. 

“I want to thank Governor Deal, the General Assembly, and our stakeholder groups for their support of this legislation and Georgia’s wildlife programs,” said Mark Williams, DNR commissioner.

The plates sporting an eagle, quail, trout or hummingbird provide vital funds for conserving rare and other wildlife such as gopher tortoises and swallow-tailed kites. Tags have helped acquire thousands of acres of wildlands open to Georgians, restore bobwhite quail and habitats, and enhance trout fisheries. Since Wildlife Resources Division work focused on quail and nongame – wildlife not legally fished for or hunted – receives no state appropriations, tag sales and renewals are the main source of local funds. 

In 2013, DNR, along with Governor Deal, unveiled new wildlife tags featuring eye-catching designs of the eagle, trout and quail (www.georgiawildlife.com/conservation). And with this law change, wildlife plates will cost only $25 to buy or renew. Of that, $19 of each purchase and $20 for a renewal will go to help wildlife.

“I hope these very positive pricing changes, along with our new designs, will encourage Georgians to purchase these license plates and support Georgia’s wildlife,” said Dan Forster, DNR’s Wildlife Resources Division director.

Learn more at www.georgiawildlife.com/conservation/support.



Georgia Coyote Challenge Begins March 1

Coming back for the second year, t he Georgia Coyote Challenge highlights how citizens can effectively handle nuisance coyote issues. This year, entering will be even easier, and participants can earn up to 10 entries in three separate drawings (between March and August), according to the Georgia Department of Natural Resources’ Wildlife Resources Division.  “Negative ... (click for more)

City Of Cleveland To Offer Lifeguard Courses

The City of Cleveland will be offering lifeguard review and certification courses this spring. The lifeguard review course costs $100 and the lifeguard certification course costs $200. All classes will be held at the Denning Center, 350 Central Avenue, Cleveland, Tn. 37311. For registration and additional questions, contact Kelly McClanahan at kmcclanahan@clevelandtn.gov ... (click for more)

1 Dead, Another Injured In Shooting On Carousel Road

One man was shot and killed and another man injured in a shooting on Carousel Road lateTuesday afternoon. The incident happened around 5:25 p.m. One man was dead at the scene, and the other was taken to a hospital. Carousal Road is off Greenwood Road in a neighborhood behind Taylor Funeral Home on Wilcox Boulevard. (click for more)

City Council Approves TIF For Extension Of MLK Boulevard To The Riverwalk

The City Council voted Tuesday to approve Tax Increment Financing (TIF) to extend MLK Boulevard across Riverfront Parkway to the Blue Goose Hollow Trailhead at the Riverwalk. The agreement is with Evergreen Real Estate of Nashville to build the extension across property it has already begun to develop at the site across from the old Newton Chevrolet and Kelly Subaru. The developer ... (click for more)

MLK Boulevard TIF Is A Public Scam From People You Should be Able To Trust

TIFs (Tax Incremental Financing) were created to allow cities to do projects they cannot afford.  A TIF project also allows various private construction costs to be subsidized by sequestered  future  property taxes that normally would go into the general fund for running a city. It’s credit card spending with a new fancy name. Politicians love it because it sounds ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: One Principal’s Reaction

On the morning after the mass shooting in Florida last week, a 17-year-old at Ledyard High School in Connecticut made an offhand comment during his first period class, “I could buy an AR-15.” At that, all the teachers panicked. Really. The school was soon so rattled by the comment the principal called the cops. And those five words got the child shackled, taken into custody, and ... (click for more)