Lee Women Golfers Lead Gulf South Conference Tournament

Monday, April 21, 2014

Paced by the consistent play of four golfers, the Lee University women's golf team will take a one-stroke lead into the final round of the Gulf South Conference Championship being held at the Tunica National (Miss.) Golf Club.

"I'm pleased with our round today," said coach John Maupin after Monday's play. "It was a solid effort from our team. We got off to a slow start, but rebounded well and turned in a good score.

"I thought we showed a lot of firepower out there, with eight birdies and three eagles," he proclaimed.
"Obviously that means we were hitting some really good shots.

"By the same token, we also gave away a few easy shots and we'll look to get those back tomorrow. We will be playing with two great teams on Tuesday (West Florida and West Georgia). We are looking forward to the opportunity."
The Lady Flames tallied a 305 and hold a one-stroke margin over West Florida (306) and five strokes over West Georgia (310). Seven teams are taking part in the 36-hole event.

Sophomore Bernadette Little set the pace for Lee. As coach Maupin explained, she started slow on the front (41) but came in with a 34 and the 3-over par 75 total. One of the highlights of the day was an eagle by the lefty on the par 4, No. 5 hole. She holed out her second shot from some 130-yards out.

Freshman Cori Burns joined the eagle club by knocking in a 30-foot putt for an 3 on the par 5, No. 3 hole. Burns finished with a 4-over 76. Senior Courtney Shelton and junior Madison Alexander rounded out the Lee scores that counted. Each tallied a 77 on the 5,816-yard course.

The final eagle was registered by junior Callie Kitchens. She put a second shot within 10-foot of the cup and converted the putt for a 3. Kitchens finished the day with an 82.

Shorter's Pauline Schopp (71) is the leader in the medalist competition. Little is in a group of three tied for second. West Florida's Aimee Paterson and West Georgia's Lola Uribe Astolfi also came in at 75. Burns and West Florida's Camila Sevilano are deadlocked for fifth, while Shelton and Alexander are tied with three others for seventh.

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