Keith Sanford Is 2014 Chattanooga Area Manager Of The Year

Monday, April 28, 2014
Keith Sanford, market president of First Tennessee Bank in the Chattanooga area, has been named the 2014 Chattanooga Area Manager of the Year. He will be honored with the award during a luncheon celebrating his achievements June 4 at the Chattanooga Convention Center.
 
Member organizations of CAMOY (Chattanooga Area Manager of the Year) award the annual honor, now in its 28th year, to recognize an executive manager who has made significant contributions to the Chattanooga area.
 
According to Dan Saieed, the 2014 CAMOY event chair, Mr.
Sanford’s commitment to both community involvement and outstanding customer service makes him an ideal candidate for the award.
 
“Mr. Sanford’s leadership in utilizing great customer service played a major role in First Tennessee’s rise to the largest bank in Chattanooga,” said Mr. Saieed. “His many civic achievements and support of numerous local causes demonstrate a commitment to our city, and he is widely respected for his work ethic and stellar character.”
 
Mr. Sanford began his career with First Tennessee Bank in 1980 as a management trainee fresh out of college. Over the course of his 34-year tenure in banking, he worked his way to the top spot of market president.
 
One of his proudest professional achievements is helping First Tennessee become the largest bank in Chattanooga, a benchmark the company achieved four years ago.
 
“My goal is to differentiate First Tennessee from our competition by leading my team in delivering outstanding customer service,” Mr. Sanford said. “In my mind, that starts by treating both co-workers and employees as equals and as you want to be treated. It also means practicing ethical business behavior, being easy to do business with and following through.”  
 
In his current role as market president, Mr. Sanford oversees approximately 250 employees in the local market. He actively mentors young First Tennessee employees, and is known for being approachable and always willing to listen. He encourages employees to find a healthy balance between work and family.
 
Mr. Sanford is extensively involved in the community, and supports local economic development in various leadership roles, currently serving on both the board and the executive committee of the Chattanooga Area Chamber of Commerce, and as vice chairman of the City of Lookout Mountain Planning Commission. Mr. Sanford was also a founding member of Choose Chattanooga, a nonprofit organization promoting the Chattanooga area as a thriving, livable community.
 
Passionate about art, history and land conservancy, Mr. Sanford supports these causes by serving on boards and committees of numerous organizations, including ArtsBuild, the Hunter Museum of American Art and the Lookout Mountain Conservancy. Sanford’s current civic involvement supports the Chattanooga Rotary Club, the Tennessee Aquarium, United Way and others. Sanford is also a member of The Church of Good Shepherd Episcopal Church, where he serves on the Vestry and as both treasurer and verger.
 
Mr. Sanford holds a bachelor’s degree in business from Washington and Lee University. He is the father of four and has been married to his wife, Julia Grosvenor Sanford, for over 32 years.
 
Local business leaders will celebrate Mr. Sanford’s achievements on June 4, at the 2014 CAMOY Luncheon at 11:30 a.m. at the Chattanooga Convention Center. Individual tickets are $45; corporate tables seating eight guests are $450. Advance registration is required by May 23. Contact Valerie Gifford to reserve a spot at 423.634.3563 or valerie.gifford@tvfcu.com.
 
To learn more about the Chattanooga Area Manager of the Year Award, visit www.camoy.org.

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