Registration For Dalton State Summer Classes Is Underway

Friday, May 02, 2014

Dalton State summer classes are offered in one eight-week session, or two four-week sessions between May 19 and July 19 and are open to Dalton State students as well as students of other schools looking to get ahead over the summer break. Registration is currently underway for summer classes; the application deadline is Thursday, May 8.


“Any student pursuing a program could easily take up a summer course that applies to their area of study, whether they are working toward a certificate, associate degree, or bachelor degree,” said Admission Counselor Jonathan Marks.


Summer classes follow the same scheduling protocol as fall and spring classes at Dalton State, with three sessions offered during a semester, according to Marks. ‘A’ session classes will run from May 19 to July 19, ‘B’ session classes will run from May 19 to June 16, and ‘C’ session classes will run from June 18 to July 19.


“Summer semester is also very popular with transient students,” says Marks, “Local students who attend other colleges and universities can take a few classes close to home over the summer and take advantage of Dalton State's affordable tuition.”


Financial aid may be available to those who qualify. Any student interested in aid for the summer semester is encouraged to apply for financial aid even though the priority deadline has passed. 

Those with any further questions regarding admission or financial aid are encouraged to call the Dalton State College Office of Admission at 706/272-4436.


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