Chattanooga Planning, Engineering And Environmental Firm Celebrates 25th Anniversary

Thursday, May 29, 2014

In celebration of its 25th year in business, Littlejohn Engineering Associates has changed its name to Littlejohn to reflect the firm’s growth and expanded services.

“Our new name illustrates our broader reach and expanded services,” said Jim Littlejohn, president. “Just as in planning and engineering, we always try to remember that the simplest solution is usually the best solution. We’re taking the same approach looking ahead with our name and our brand – efficient, understandable, straightforward and collaborative.

  We want our name to be synonymous with professionalism and quality service delivery.”

Founded in 1989 in Nashville, Tenn., Littlejohn works with public and private clients across the country to plan and engineer infrastructure for notable projects and progressive communities. Consulting services in surveying, engineering, planning, landscape architecture, environmental services, industrial hygiene, health and safety are the core components of Littlejohn’s expertise, and in just 25 years, the firm has grown from a sole proprietorship, to a national firm with eight offices in Tennessee, Florida, Arizona and Alabama.

Littlejohn is a multi-discipline professional services firm and has completed more than 6,000 projects in 42 states, employing more than 125 engineers, landscape architects, planners, surveyors, environmental scientists, industrial hygienists and support personnel.

“We have some of the most talented individuals and creative teams in the business,” said Mr. Littlejohn. “To us, a project is much more than just concrete, steel, brick and mortar – it represents the core of who we are.”

In Chattanooga, and throughout East Tennessee, Littlejohn has worked on hundreds of projects to support cities, utilities and institutional clients with water, wastewater and stormwater engineering services. The team in Littlejohn’s Chattanooga office consists of experts in sanitary sewer rehabilitation, asset inspection and maintenance, geographic information systems, and development of Capacity, Management, Operations and Maintenance Plans. Additionally, the staff in Littlejohn’s Chattanooga office assists private industry and manufacturing clientele with Environmental Monitoring Services to protect the health and safety of their employees and the environment.

“25 Years as a prosperous business is a testament to Littlejohn’s commitment to client satisfaction and quality of work,” said Scott McDonald, Littlejohn’s Chattanooga business manager. “With each New Year, our dedication to these values remains constant. As a Hamilton County native, I have had the pleasure of watching Chattanooga evolve into a thriving community that continuously works to improve the quality of life for its residents. It is important to me that Littlejohn contributes to the advancement of Chattanooga by improving and developing infrastructure and utilities that support the growth of our community.

"As it has in the past, Littlejohn will continue to invest in the newest technology essential to meeting tomorrow’s engineering challenges, while embracing best practices and lessons learned, to develop infrastructure, landscapes and built environments that stand the test of time."

“I’m very proud of what we’ve been able to accomplish as a professional service firm – across our offices from Florida to Arizona – and I’m extremely proud of our talented professionals who work together so well to serve our clients,” said Mr. Littlejohn. “I can’t wait to see what the next 25 years will bring,”


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