Southern Surgical Arts Announces Grand Opening Of Chattanooga Southside Facility

Saturday, May 31, 2014

Southern Surgical Arts announced the grand opening of its new office and surgery center on Monday.

The cosmetic surgery practice is located in Chattanooga’s Southside district of downtown.

Dr. Carey Nease, the company’s founding partner and a board-certified cosmetic and facial plastic surgeon, said of the new location, “Southern Surgical Arts is known for its surgical artistry, which makes the Southside area a perfect fit for our new office.”

Dr. Chad Deal, a partner in Southern Surgical Arts and a board-certified cosmetic surgeon, states, “The Southside is a great fit for us because the area is experiencing such growth and rejuvenation. We strive to deliver the latest technology and techniques to our patients, and that is the feel you get from all the development on the Southside of Chattanooga.”

The new 25,000-square-foot development will be the largest new office building in the area in more than two decades. The new building, named “Southside Station,” is located between Cowart and Broad Streets, just one block away from Main Street. Southern Surgical Arts will feature a medical spa and two state-of-the-art surgical suites in which patients desiring cosmetic surgery may be better served.

Southern Surgical Arts is a Chattanooga cosmetic surgery practice.  Dr. Nease and Dr. Deal have performed more than 10,000 cosmetic surgery procedures with over 15 years of experience between them. Each physician has earned a number of professional awards individually as well as for collaborative efforts throughout their careers.


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