GPS Stands In Support Of Finding Missing Nigerian Girls

Thursday, May 8, 2014

In addition to signing petitions and educating themselves on the violent kidnapping of hundreds of Nigerian schoolgirls on April 14, GPS students and faculty stood in unison on Wednesday in a show of support for the families awaiting word on the whereabouts and hoping for rescue of their daughters and sisters.  

In a collective call for action, the GPS community wore shades of red in solidarity with the mothers of the kidnapped girls who have worn red in their marches in Nigeria. New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof reported Sunday: 

"These girls, ages 15 to 18 and Christians and Muslims alike, knew the risks of seeking an education, and schools in the area had closed in March for fear of terror attacks. But this school had reopened so that the girls -- the stars of their families and villages -- could take their final exams. They were expected to move on to become teachers, doctors, lawyers."  

GPS was responding to the crisis in concert with other member schools of the National Coalition of Girls Schools. NCGS also encouraged students to take initiatives such as contacting politicians and organizing rallies. 

Nigerian officials reported Tuesday that they have accepted military, law enforcement, and other agency offers of assistance from the United States.


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