Governor Haslam Announces 37 Historic Preservation Fund Grants

Tuesday, June 10, 2014
Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam and the Tennessee Historical Commission announced 37 Historic Preservation Fund grants were awarded to community organizations for programs and activities that support the preservation of historic and archaeological sites, districts and structures.

“Protecting Tennessee’s historic places is critical to preserving our state’s heritage,” Haslam said. “Today’s announcement of more than $600,000 in assistance to communities across the state helps ensure that Tennessee’s rich history will continue to be shared with future generations.

The grants awarded from the Historic Preservation Fund allocated to the Tennessee Historical Commission have been awarded to community and civic organizations for projects that support the preservation of historic and archaeological resources. Awarded annually, 60% of the project funds are from the federal Historic Preservation Fund and 40% of project funds come from the grantee.

Grants are competitive and this year the Tennessee Historical Commission reviewed 63 applications with funding requests totaling approximately $1.9 million.

This year’s selection included archaeological surveys, design guidelines for historic districts, rehabilitation of historic buildings, posters highlighting the state’s history and archaeology and brochures related to historic tourism.

One of the grant priorities is projects that are in Certified Local Governments, a program that allows communities to participate closely in the federal program of historic preservation. Ten Certified Local Government communities were awarded grants this year.

Additional priorities include areas experiencing rapid growth and development, other threats to cultural resources, areas where there are gaps in knowledge regarding cultural resources and the restoration of the state’s historic buildings that are owned by civic or nonprofit organizations. Properties that use the restoration grants must be listed in the National Register.

The grant recipients and/or sites of the projects include: 

In Carter County:

* Carter County - $12,000 to fund the restoration of windows in the National Register-listed Carter County Courthouse.

In Claiborne County:

* Claiborne County Historical Society - $12,000 to fund the brick and mortar restoration in the third phase of the restoration for the National Register-listed Claiborne County Jail.

 In Clay County:

* Clay County - $7,200 to fund the upgrading of the electrical system in the courthouse, the first phase in the restoration of the National Register-listed building.

 In Davidson County:

* Metro Historical Commission - $12,000 to fund the completion of nominations for two residential historical districts in the Inglewood community of Davidson County.

* Middle Tennessee State University, Public History Program - $15,000 to fund an archaeological survey of a historic archaeological site in Davidson County.

 In Fayette County:

* Fayette County - $12,000 to fund the restoration of windows in the National Register-listed Fayette County Courthouse.

 In Greene County:

* Town of Greeneville - $10,000 to fund window restoration for the National Register-listed Dixon-Williams Mansion.

 In Haywood County:

* City of Brownsville - $18,000 to fund maps, brochures and digital access showing the historic areas of the city.

 In Jackson County:

* Town of Gainesboro - $12,000 to fund the restoration and replacement of tile in the National Register-listed Fox School, part of a phased restoration.

 In Jefferson County:

* Town of Dandridge - $9,000 to fund the restoration of the exterior of the National Register-listed Hickman Tavern/Dandridge Town Hall.

 In Knox County:

* Knox Heritage - $6,000 to fund the restoration of windows in National Register-listed Westwood.

 In Lewis County:

* City of Hohenwald - $12,000 to fund the restoration of the National Register-listed Hohenwald Depot.

 In Monroe County:

* Monroe County - $12,000 to fund the continued restoration of brickwork on the National Register-listed Monroe County Courthouse.

 In Overton County:

* Shirley Bohannon American Legion Post #4 - $12,000 to fund the restoration of the National Register-listed American Legion Post #4 building.

 In Pickett County:

* East Tennessee State University - $15,000 to fund a multi-disciplinary study of a prehistoric archaeological site in Pickett State Forest.

 In Putnam County;

* City of Cookeville - $1,200 to fund a self-guided walking tour for three local historic districts.

 In Roane County;

* City of Harriman - $12,000 to fund design guidelines for National Register-listed and locally designated historic districts.

 In Shelby County:

* City of Memphis - $7,200 to fund a historic structures report for the National Register-listed Mallory-Neely House.

 In Sumner County:

* City of Portland - $12,000 to fund stabilization and restoration of the National Register-listed Moye-Green House.

 In Warren County:

* William H. Magness Community House and Library - $12,000 to fund masonry restoration on the National Register-listed Magness Library.

 In Williamson County:

* City of Franklin - $20,000 to fund ground penetrating radar investigations and digital drafting of the National Register-listed Rest Haven Cemetery and Franklin City Cemetery.

* Heritage Foundation of Franklin and Williamson County - $9,000 to fund the restoration of windows in the National Register-listed Old, Old Jail.

 Multi-County Grants:

* Tennessee Preservation Trust - $12,000 to fund the 2015 Statewide Historic Preservation Conference.

* Tennessee History for Kids - $10,000 to fund posters for Tennessee schools and libraries, highlighting historic preservation in Tennessee.

* Middle Tennessee State University, Department of Sociology and Anthropology - $3,738 to fund posters for Tennessee Archaeology Week.

* Middle Tennessee State University, Fullerton Laboratory for Spatial Technology - $50,000 to digitize data for historic/architectural survey files and for survey data entry for computerization of survey files.

* Tennessee Division of Archaeology - $10,000 to fund a continuation of a survey of Rosenwald schools and school sites.

* Southeast Tennessee Tourism Association - $7,200 to fund a driving trail, rack cards and digital information for historic mining resources in southeast Tennessee.

* East Tennessee Development District - $32,000 to fund a preservation specialist staff position for the First Tennessee Development District.

* First Tennessee Development District - $25,000 to fund a preservation specialist staff position for the First Tennessee Development District.

* Greater Nashville Regional Council - $25,000 to fund a preservation specialist staff position for the Greater Nashville Regional Council.

* Memphis Area Association of Governments - $32,000 to fund a preservation specialist staff position for the Memphis Area Association of Governments.

* Northwest Tennessee Development District - $36,000 to fund a preservation specialist staff position for the Northwest Tennessee Development District.

* South Central Tennessee Development District - $50,000 to fund a preservation specialist staff position for the South Central Tennessee Development District.

* Southeast Tennessee Development District - $52,000 to fund a preservation specialist staff position for the Southeast Tennessee Development District.

* Southwest Tennessee Development District - $54,000 to fund a preservation specialist staff position for the Southwest Tennessee Development District.

* Upper Cumberland Development District - $50,000 to fund a preservation specialist staff position for the Upper Cumberland Development District.

For more information about the Tennessee Historical Commission, please visit http://www.tn.gov/environment/history/.




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