Flightless Geese Require Patience During The Summer

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

The Canada goose is an adaptable bird that can live in a variety of locations, including open farmland and rural reservoirs to suburban neighborhood ponds, office complexes, parks and other developed areas.

This proximity to people sometimes leads to frustration, especially in the summertime when everyone heads outdoors to potentially discover areas of feathers and feces.  However, the Georgia Department of Natural Resources’ Wildlife Resources Division asks people to be patient with geese, especially during a particular part of the summer.

“Each summer, geese go through a molting process during which they lose their flight feathers and grow new ones,” says WRD State Waterfowl Biologist Greg Balkcom.  “During the molt, there is a period of a few weeks in late June and early July when geese can’t fly.  It is typically during this time that landowners and homeowners often get irritated with the amount of goose feces and feathers left behind.” 

So, what can you do if you have goose problems?  During most times of the year, geese can be scared away with the use of harassment techniques.  But because geese cannot fly during the molt, these techniques may not work, making people frustrated when the geese just won’t leave.  In these cases, WRD personnel encourage affected landowners and homeowners to be patient.  The new feathers will soon grow in, and the geese will regain their ability to fly and will likely move on. 

However, if geese continue to cause problems, here are a few tips to try and reduce the trouble: 

· Harassment: Landowners who don’t want geese on their property can first try a variety of harassment techniques, including chemical repellents, mylar balloons, wire/string barriers, and noise makers.  These methods are proven to help reduce goose problems.  However, they require consistency from the property owner and are not always 100% effective.

· Relocation or Lethal Methods: Homeowners who want to reduce or eliminate the goose population on their property can obtain a permit from their local WRD Game Management office (www.georgiawildlife.com/about/contact).  This permit allows them to have geese captured and relocated to a suitable area or allows them to legally and lethally remove the animals.  The removal can be done by the homeowner or by a licensed nuisance wildlife trapper (list found at www.georgiawildlife.com/nuisancewildlife).

It is important to remember that Canada geese are a protected species under state and federal law. It is illegal to hunt, kill, sell, purchase or possess Canada geese except according to Georgia's migratory bird regulations.

For more information, visit the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service website at www.fws.gov/permits. For a brochure on a variety of methods of dealing with nuisance geese, visit www.georgiawildlife.com (Select “Hunting”, “Game Management” and “Nuisance Canada Geese”).


Program Change For April Nature @ Noontime Program

A change has been made for the program for the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency’s April Nature @ Noontime program. The new program will be presented on Native Bees: The Unknown Soldiers . It will be held on Thursday, at noon in the TWRA’s Region II Ray Bell Building located in the Ellington Agriculture Complex. Polly Rooker, of TWRA Region II will be presenter. There are ... (click for more)

TWRA To Be Part Of Nature Fest

Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency will again be part of the Nature Fest held on  Tuesday, April 16 through Friday, April 19  at Pennebaker Hall on the Tennessee Tech University campus. The event highlights the wonderful, natural diversity found on the Cumberland Plateau through lectures, hikes and hands-on activities. The event is free and great for families.  ... (click for more)

Tennessee Broadband Expansion Bill Sought By EPB Put On Hold For Now

Advocates for broadband expansion in Tennessee, including Chattanooga's EPB, announced Tuesday that efforts to extend community-based fiber optic networks are being placed on hold for now "because there is not enough support among state lawmakers to change a state regulation that prevents the expansion of municipal fiber optic systems." EPB earlier won a ruling from the Federal ... (click for more)

Haslam Adds K-12 Funds In Budget Amendment

Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam on Tuesday unveiled additions to the FY 2015-2016 budget that will be considered by the General Assembly in the coming weeks, including added funding for K-12. The governor last week met with school superintendents from the largest systems in the state over the issue of state funding for K-12. The next day, the Hamilton County Schools joined ... (click for more)

Physicians Thank Their Patients On Doctor’s Day

March 30 has been set aside as National Doctors’ Day since 1933 as a time to recognize the contributions made by our physicians. While the recognition is appreciated, our greatest satisfaction comes from caring for our patients.  For 132 years, the Chattanooga-Hamilton County Medical Society has been the physicians’ voice as we worked together to improve health of our community. ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: Look At My April Garden

On this April Fool’s Day, as I take my monthly stroll through my virtual garden, there are gorgeous flowers and there are weeds, which appear to be trying harder than the flowers. So let’s see what we find before searching for “The Prize Egg” on Sunday. A FLOWER to the New York cab driver who told a young writer, “Always remember that everyone you meet knows something that you ... (click for more)