BLUES Project Works To Reduce Infant Mortality Rates By Hosting Community Health Fair

Wednesday, June 18, 2014

As part of its fight to reduce infant mortality rates in Tennessee, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center’s BLUES (Building Lasting Unshakable Expectations into Successes) Project will host a community health fair for moms-to-be and their families.

Representatives from the research and community outreach program along vendors such as Virginia College, Erlanger Health Systems, Blue Cross Blue Shield and many more will be in attendance to provide door prizes, health screenings and a day of pampering. Awareness information about infant mortality and maternal health will also be provided. The health fair will take place from 9 a.m.-noon on July 2, at the Glenwood Recreation Center located at 2610 E. 3rd Street Chattanooga, Tn. 37404.

Tennessee’s infant mortality rate of 7.2 deaths per 1,000 live births is one of the worst in the nation. In 2011, the Chattanooga-Hamilton County Health Department website reported that Hamilton County had an infant mortality rate of 7.9 per 1,000 live births. 

Those rates are the result of many internal and external environmental factors.In Chattanooga, a great majority of premature babies are born to people who have not graduated from high school,” said Linda Moses, MD, FACOG, director of The Blues Project. “Premature births are a large contributor to infant mortality.”  Dr. Moses is an assistant professor at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center in Memphis.

The BLUES Project, which originated in Memphis, is a community outreach and research program that provides education, counseling and psychosocial support to pregnant women. Services continue until the child’s second birthday. The program is funded by the BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee Health Foundation. 

The project aims to decrease the number of deaths of babies under age one. The mission is to help families have full-term healthy babies by assisting parents in developing their own support system and empowering mothers to establish and achieve attainable life goals. The BLUES Project has been in operation in Chattanooga since 2010.

To be eligible for the UTHSC BLUES Project, women must be fewer than 29 weeks pregnant, voluntarily sign an informed consent form, agree to provide a medical record of mother and infant to the BLUES team, attend educational sessions, and be receptive to case management. 

Participants also receive educational information regarding pregnancy and baby care, special gifts, social and community support during and after pregnancy, and links to helpful community agencies and resources.

For more information, contact Quetta Pipkin, Community Outreach coordinator of the UTHSC BLUES Project-Chattanooga site, at bluesproject@uthsc.edu or 423 778-5721.

 


Latest Census Bureau Population Estimates Indicate Aging Across Tennessee

According to numbers released Thursday by the U.S. Census Bureau, Tennessee's 2015 median age is 38.6 years, slightly older than the U.S. median age, which rose from 37.7 in 2014 to 37.8 in 2015.  The data release includes national, state and county population estimates for 2015 by age, sex, race and Hispanic origin.  A partner to the U.S. Census Bureau, the Tennessee ... (click for more)

Alexander Says Congress Needs To Pass 21st Century Cures Now

Senate health chairman Lamar Alexander on Thursday said the miraculous eyesight recovery of Tennessean Doug Oliver underscores the need for passage of 21st Century Cures to “unleash medical innovation and give more Americans access to life-changing treatments and life-saving cures, like Doug did.”  Senator Alexander made his remarks at a Bipartisan Policy Center event alongside ... (click for more)

Preserving 90-Year-Old Grammar School Just One Of Challenges Facing Town, Signal Council Told

Rather than spend millions upgrading Signal Mountain ’s historic grammar school so it can continue to house the Mountain Arts Community Center (MACC), it would make more sense to incorporate that project into a larger multi-pronged one that would solve several issues facing the community, according to town manager Boyd Veal.   For example, Mr. Veal said, the current ... (click for more)

Firefighters Put Out Fire In Compost Pile At City's Wood Recycling Center

Chattanooga firefighters were called to a fire at the city's wood recycling center on N. Hawthorne Street around noon on Sunday. Battalion Chief Don Bowman said the smoke and flames could be seen from several miles away.   Firefighters with five fire companies worked to get the blaze under control, using master streams from two aerials and some hand-held hoselines. The ... (click for more)

Improvements Needed At Entrance To Wilcox Tunnel

I am writing this letter to bring to your attention to a city traffic issue that needs to be addressed immediately, the sooner the better. I can see no large cost factor.   Recently, while as a concerned citizen, removing trash and litter from the entry/exit area of the Wilcox Tunnel on the side that runs into Chamberlain Avenue, I fully realized that this area could ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: Looking For A Wife

Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, is a really cool place. I tried to buy a huge mounted buffalo head in an antique store there one time until I found out the shipping charges were four times what the head was worth. But suddenly my rapt attention is riveted on Coeur d'Alene again because a dazzling social experiment is taking place this very moment at a plush resort in north Idaho. Several ... (click for more)