Early Settlers of Washington County, TN Published

Thursday, June 19, 2014

The Jonesborough Genealogical Society will publish the first of a three volume full colored set of books in its Early Settlers of Washington County, Tennessee series. The Early Settlers of Washington County, Tennessee: (pre) 1768-1777, edited by Jan Teinert,  Joani Range-Douglas, Chad Fred Bailey, and Elaine Scott Cantrell, with paintings by Vivian Meitron, will be published later this year, but you may pre-order this book beginning on Sunday, June 1, 2014, for $90 a copy. Only five hundred copies will be available! This will be a great gift for you, as well as your children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren! Get yours today!

In addition, for anyone who would like to be a sponsor of this book and support this publication you may begin to purchase sponsorship pages in this book on Sunday, June 1, 2014. Twenty full colored Sponsor’s Pages will be available with different size sponsorship available. Both the order form and sponsorship form can be obtained by emailing Chad Fred Bailey at chadfredb@gmail.com, or Joani Range-Douglas at joani1234@gmail.com or by visiting the Jonesborough Genealogical Society at the Washington County-Jonesborough Library, 200 Sabin Drive, Jonesborough, TN, or visit our website at http://jgstn.wordpress.com/early-settlers-of-washington-county-tennessee/ for more information on this volume.

This book will feature the History and Archeology of the Cherokee in the Watauga and Nolichucky River Valleys by Nathan Shreve, Biographies of the Cherokee, History of Longhunters and Explorers by Chad Fred Bailey, Biographies of Settlers from 1768 to 1777, History of Government, Law and Military by Billie McNamara, History of the area including the four settlements: Holston, Watauga, Nolichucky and Carter’s Valley, Washington District, Washington County, North Carolina.

By our count, there are over 500 documented persons who made East Tennessee their home, by the end of 1777.  Also, highlighted is the fact that prior to settlement the area was inhabited by the Cherokee and other important tribes.

If you had ancestors who settled in our area prior to 1799 and would like to be included in any of the books, please contact us by emailing Chad Fred Bailey at chadfredb@gmail.com, or Joani Range-Douglas at joani1234@gmail.com or by mail at Early Settlers of Washington County, Tennessee, Jonesborough Genealogical Society, 200 Sabin Drive, Jonesborough, Tennessee 37659.  Submissions are now being accepted.  More information about how to submit your family’s history can be found on our website at http://www.jgstn.wordpress.com.

The Early Settler Certificate program is open to everyone who had ancestors in the area prior to 1840 and can prove they are related to them.  Details of this project can be found on our website at www.jgstn.wordpress.com/more-about-the-jgs/early-settler-of-washington-county-tennessee-certificates/, and an application can be printed.


Presentation on Patrick Cleburne At The Battle Of Franklin Is Nov. 14

  FRANKLIN, Tenn. – The international impact of the Civil War in Tennessee will take center stage 10:45 a.m. Friday, Nov. 14, when renowned “conflict archaeologist,” historian, and 2014 Tennessee Civil War Sesquicentennial Event keynote speaker Damian Shiels presents “Patrick Cleburne at the Battle of Franklin” at The Factory in Franklin. Confederate General Patrick Cleburne ... (click for more)

Viaduct at Jonas Bluff Improved the Safety of Cummings Highway

Modern road construction equipment and highway projects have conquered some of the challenges of traveling into the Chattanooga valley through the mountains.    However, in the days of horses, wagons, and Model T automobiles, some routes were treacherous.     From St. Elmo to the bridge across Lookout Creek, the narrow route of Wauhatchie Pike hugged the curves ... (click for more)

EPB Says "Close To A Wash" On City Street Light Billing

EPB President Harold DePriest denied Wednesday that EPB owes the city over $1 million on street light billing. He stated,  “EPB has never said that we owe the city $1.2 million. When all the facts are taken into account, the financial difference is close to a wash.” Mr. DePriest said, "I regret that this complicated issue has been oversimplified in some reports. As we’ve ... (click for more)

New Red Bank Zoning Ordinance Is Ready For Review

The new Red Bank zoning ordinance is ready for review, City Manager Randall Smith said Tuesday night. It can be seen on www.redbanktn.gov and the link to zoning regulations. The new ordinance will replace one that was created 30 years ago.    The plan will encompass both residential and commercial development and is intended to direct ... (click for more)

Why So Much For A Rail Study?

From the things that make you go hmm department. Ok, so the feds are giving us $400k and the city is kicking in another $300k for a total of $700k to do a study on having in town rail service. Why so much for a study? Don't get me wrong, I'm totally down with Chattanooga having some passenger trains running around. I get that. It's awesome. We've needed it for a long time. I ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: I’m Certainly No Expert

Sometime on Monday night, after I had written a piece on getting swatted with a switch as a kid, I got an email from ESPN Canada asking if I would be a televised guest on “Off the Record,” the most watched daily sports show in Canada. The subject: corporal punishment in America. Are you kidding me? I am hardly an expert. All weekend my world of sports and its excitement was warped ... (click for more)