Tennessee Promise Offers Opportunity For High School Students

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

There is exciting news for all senior high school students! With the new statewide program Tennessee Promise, all Tennessee high school graduates have the opportunity to attend a community college or Tennessee College of Applied Techology (TCAT) free of tuition and fees, and they will be provided a mentor to ensure their success.

"Cleveland State is partnering with Tennessee College of Applied Technology at Athens (TCAT) to raise awareness in our service area about TN Promise, how it works and when to apply,” stated Dr. Bill Seymour, CSCC President. “We want all rising high school seniors and their families to know the facts, so they can take advantage of this great opportunity.

The Tennessee Promise is patterned after tnAchieves, founded in Knox County in 2008 and now serving schools in 27 counties. The Tennessee Promise is an opportunity for all graduating high school seniors—regardless of socioeconomic status or academic performance—to obtain a credential from a TCAT or a community college free of tuition and fees by meeting the following requirements:

1)  Completing an application for Tennessee Promise prior to the stated deadline of November 1. Tennessee Promise will provide students with a last dollar scholarship, which means it will bridge the funding gap for a student after all other financial aid is applied.

2)     Working with an assigned mentor

3)    Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by the end of January

4)     Attending mandatory meeting including college orientation

5)    Applying to college prior to the stated deadline, completing registration and enrolling as a full-time student

6)     Maintaining satisfactory academic progress

7)     Performing eight hours of community service each semester

Dr. Seymour added, “The most important thing for rising high school seniors to know is you cannot wait until next year to get started.  To take advantage of TN Promise you must submit your application before November 1, 2014.”

“tnAchieves is partnering with Gov. Haslam’s Tennessee Promise to provide a last-dollar, post-secondary scholarship to any student across the state that wishes to attend college,” stated Graham Thomas, Director of Community Partnerships, tnAchieves. “This means tuition cost should no longer be an obstacle when a student is deciding to attend a community or technical college. While all public high school students are eligible for tnAchieves, the program is also open to private and home-schooled students.”  

Mr. Thomas went on to state, “Raising awareness of financial aid options and ultimately eliminating the funding barrier are obviously important; however, it is the mentoring component that sets tnAchieves apart from other programs. Each student is assigned a volunteer mentor who supports the student through admission and financial aid paperwork, motivates the student to meet deadlines, and perhaps most importantly, encourages the student to reach his/her potential.” 

According to Mr. Thomas, Tennessee Promise will need 5,000 volunteers across the state to work with the Class of 2015.  Current volunteers advise they spend only one hour per month assisting students, meaning even the person with the busiest schedule can give back and make a difference. To sign up to become a mentor, contact Mr. Thomas at 615/604-1306 or email him at graham@tnachieves.org.

For more information on the Tennessee Promise, contact Cleveland State’s Enrollment Services Center at 472-7141, ext. 310. 


Southeast Bank Provides $28,000 Scholarship At Southern Adventist University For 2016-2017

SouthEast Bank executives from the Ooltewah branch visited with Southern Adventist University’s president, David C. Smith, PhD, and three of the four students directly impacted by this scholarship gift. During the lunch award meeting Caitlyn Bartlett was asked by Carolyn Hamilton, vice president for Advancement at Southern, what it meant to have received this scholarship for ... (click for more)

Ambassador Andrew Young To Visit McCallie School

The McCallie School is proud to host Civil Rights pioneer Andrew Young — former congressman, Atlanta Mayor and U.S. Ambassador to United Nations — to speak to the Upper School student body on Tuesday, Aug. 30, to speak to the Upper School student body and later spend time speaking with students in smaller settings. Ambassador Young’s visit has been made possible ... (click for more)

Saw Mill Fire In Lookout Valley Causes $185,000 In Damages

A saw mill fire in Lookout Valley on Sunday morning caused $185,000 in damage. At approximately 7:45 a.m. , calls began coming in to Hamilton County 911 about a fire in a saw mill located at 3510 Pan Gap Circle in Lookout Valley. Smoke could be seen from downtown Chattanooga when firefighters from Station One on Main Street began to respond.   ... (click for more)

Michael Wilson Back In Bradley County; Due In Court On Monday

Michael Wilson is back in Bradley County, and was escorted into the Correctional Facility around 8:15 p.m. Wilson’s first appearance in court will be on Monday, at 9 a.m. in the Bradley County General Sessions Courtroom at the Judicial Complex at 2290 Blythe Ave. Wilson was arrested last week, after e ndangered Bradley County child Skyla Wilson was found safe in Colorado ... (click for more)

Pedestrians Have The Right Of Way - And Response (3)

Often I visit Gold's Gym at Chestnut and 4th Street. I  park in the theater parking lot at Broad and 4th Street.  I depend on the walk signs to get me there safely.  Most days I almost get hit by someone turning left or right coming from the exit ramp off 27 or turning right on 4th street from Chestnut. This happened yesterday as I was almost mowed down by a garbage ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: Girls - ‘I Can And I Will’

Every night after the Rodriguez girls went to sleep not that long ago in a grim, rat-infested basement apartment on Chicago’s South Side, their father – a boxing referee who came to America from Puerto Rico -- would kneel beside the girls’ bed and whisper in each child’s ear. Their parents made them sleep hot-dog style, tightly wrapped in the same sheet and pressed together to protect ... (click for more)