Open 24 Hours: New Exhibit In The Hunter Museum's Permanent Collection To Open July 3

Tuesday, June 24, 2014
Deborah Butterfield (b. 1949), Boreal, cast bronze with patina, 89 x 101 x 37 inches (226.1 x 256.5 x 94 cm), Museum purchase 2002.5
Deborah Butterfield (b. 1949), Boreal, cast bronze with patina, 89 x 101 x 37 inches (226.1 x 256.5 x 94 cm), Museum purchase 2002.5

The Hunter Museum announces the upcoming opening of a new exhibition, Open 24 Hours, featuring works on paper and maquettes by major sculptors in the Hunter’s permanent collection.  This exhibition will be open to the public on July 3 in advance of the holiday weekend.

"Outdoor sculpture and public art have become an important way for artists to connect and engage with audiences on a large scale. Not only does public art respond to the environment for which it is designed, it is an opportunity for the artist and community to collaborate on spaces that matter to both," officials said.

"Public art is becoming part of the fabric of every major city, and Chattanooga is no exception. The Hunter Museum has several outdoor sculptures in its collection, some of which are located in the garden outside our facility, and others in locations around the city of Chattanooga.  Open 24 Hours highlights these artists, along with other major American sculptors by considering some indoor works by them.  This exhibition includes prints, preparatory drawings, maquettes and watercolors by artists such as Dennis Oppenheim, Mark di Suvero and Richard Hunt. 

"Be sure to take one of our sculpture map brochures to explore our outdoor sculpture collection.  Consider how an object and its placement changes your perception of that space. They are, of course, open 24 hours."

Carol Mickett and Robert Stackhouse, preliminary drawing for “Place in the Woods”, watercolor, graphite, iridescent brown ink on watercolor paper, 2009, 29 7/8 x 40 3/8
Carol Mickett and Robert Stackhouse, preliminary drawing for “Place in the Woods”, watercolor, graphite, iridescent brown ink on watercolor paper, 2009, 29 7/8 x 40 3/8


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