22 Teachers Participate In ArtsBuild Leadership Program

Wednesday, June 25, 2014
ArtsBuild held its second Holmberg Arts Leadership Institute for Teachers in June
ArtsBuild held its second Holmberg Arts Leadership Institute for Teachers in June

ArtsBuild held its second Holmberg Arts Leadership Institute for Teachers in June. The program is based on the organization’s arts leadership institute presented each fall.

The summer Institute gives K-12 classroom teachers and administrators the opportunity to gain a more in-depth understanding of the role the arts play in the greater Chattanooga area. Classes included presentations on the arts in underserved areas, economic development, public art, and funding for the arts. The program also included hands-on activities, tours of arts organizations and artist studios as well as special guest speakers and panelists from the community. 

Twenty-two teachers participated in this year’s Institute, representing 18 public and private schools. Many of the participants were traditional art teachers; however, there were also science, social studies, Spanish, administrators, librarians and physical education teachers as well. 

"The Holmberg Arts Leadership Institute was a wonderful experience for me,” said Sharon Leath, a physical education teacher at Smith Elementary.  “As an elementary school physical education teacher I was not sure how the Institute would really impact my teaching.  I was a little worried I would be out of my league and not very relevant to the discussion.  I was amazed.  From the moment I arrived I was captivated and impressed by the potential and opportunity arts and culture share with our community.  We live in a vibrant, creative world and ArtsBuild is fostering and nurturing Chattanooga and its people—all its people—not just artsy or cultured people but everyone who lives, breathes, works, visits, or just passes through.  My eyes are now open, and I can share this energy and creative spirit with all my students, co-workers, family, and friends for years to come.”

“To our knowledge, this is the only arts leadership program for teachers in the country," said Rodney Van Valkenburg, ArtsBuild's director of grants and initiatives.  "Through the Institute, teachers make connections with our arts community and have a deeper appreciation of our arts infrastructure which will benefit the educators professionally and personally.” 

2014 Holmberg Arts Leadership Institute for Teachers participants:
 

Mary Avans, Barger Academy of Fine Arts

Chad Burnette, Center for Creative Arts

Chris Cooper, Ooltewah Middle School

Laura Dowd, Red Bank Elementary

Vicki Edwards, Loftis, Red Bank Middle School, Lookout Valley

Zephanie Flippin, East Lake Elementary School

Catherine Gilreath, Big Ridge Elementary School

Kendra Harris, East Lake Elementary School

Katie Hetrick, Battle Academy

Cathie Kasch, Girls Preparatory School

Debbie Kelly, Barger Academy of Fine Arts

Liz Kimball, Sequoyah High School

Sharon Leath, Smith Elementary School

Michelle Leavy, Normal Park Museum Magnet School

Sandra Lehn, Brown Academy

Isabel McCall, Girls Preparatory School

Gail Moore, Former K-12 Art Instructor

Candace Russell, Red Bank Elementary School

Nicole Song, Battle Academy

Kim Thompson, Daisy Elementary School

Pamela Watson, Chattanooga School for the Arts & Sciences

Michael Weger, Hixson Middle School

Applications for the Fall Holmberg Arts Leadership Institute will be available in July at www.ArtsBuild.com.
 


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