TWRA Reminder: Removing Whitetail Fawns From The Wild Does More Harm Than Good

Thursday, June 26, 2014
Wildlife Officers responded to a call about a fawn lying outside the public works building in Oak Ridge.  In spite of concerned citizens with good intentions wanting to help, the fawn was not interfered with and was rejoined with its mother upon her return.
Wildlife Officers responded to a call about a fawn lying outside the public works building in Oak Ridge. In spite of concerned citizens with good intentions wanting to help, the fawn was not interfered with and was rejoined with its mother upon her return.

The TWRA is reminding citizens to think twice before removing whitetail fawns from the wild in an attempt to rescue them from seeming abandonment.

Recently, TWRA Wildlife Officers have responded to an overwhelming number of calls reporting abandoned fawns that in most cases would have been better off left alone.

Anderson County Wildlife Officer Jason Lankford offers this information to those who may be considering rescuing a fawn: “The main points that I consider are that the doe spends less than four hours a day with the fawn and while she may look like a bad mother, in nature this is a very successful strategy.  She’ll visit the fawn when it needs it, otherwise it will sit contently looking abandoned but nothing is further from the truth. When a fawn is picked up, its chances of survival and ever being reaccepted into the deer herd drop dramatically.”  Unless it is confirmed that the mother is dead and the fawn is very small, the best option is to leave it alone.

Carter County Wildlife Officer John Ripley has also seen a dramatic spike in calls regarding abandoned fawns.  “The Wynn Wood Wildlife Rehabilitation Center in Carter Co. is at capacity for orphaned fawns,” said Officer Ripley who also mentions that when someone takes in a fawn and tries to care for it, there is great potential for attachment and is a captive wildlife situation.


Red Clay State Historic Park Survey Available Through March 27

The survey asking for community input regarding the amenities at   Red Clay State Historic Park is available through March 27. The survey is specifically designed for overall park visitors. Officials are asking for the public's assistance in helping TDEC get the word out about this particular survey.  Tennessee State Parks is interested in finding out what park visitors ... (click for more)

Nashville Frogwatch Is Subject For Nature @ Noontime Program In April

Lisa Powers, founding president of the Tennessee Herpetological Society and co-coordinator for the Nashville Zoo’s FrogWatch Program, will be the featured speaker for the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency’s April Nature @ Noontime. The program will be held on Thursday, April 2 at the TWRA’s Region II Ray Bell Building located in the Ellington Agriculture Complex. In addition, ... (click for more)

Man Charged In Shooting On Sixth Avenue Had Been Shot Himself Last Week

A man charged with attempted first-degree murder on Sixth Avenue on Thursday afternoon was shot himself earlier this month. Oshae Kadaris Smith, 20, of 2114 E. 12th St., is also charged with reckless endangerment, aggravated assault and possessing a firearm during the commission of a crime. He was one of two people shot on Rawlings Street on March 16. Kendre Allen, 18, ... (click for more)

Fire On Crutchfield Street Ruled Arson

Chattanooga fire investigators have determined that last Thursday’s fire at 1207 Crutchfield St.  that nearly killed four people was deliberately set. Lt. Henry McElvain with the Fire Investigation Division said he cannot divulge the reason why he thinks it’s arson, but he is asking for help from the public. If anyone has information that can help solve this case, call ... (click for more)

The Problems With Prescription Drug Addiction

In Tennessee today, we have a major problem with prescription drug addiction, particularly when powerful opioid pain relievers are concerned.    For the first time in 2012, Tennesseans abused prescription opioid drugs more than alcohol.  Our young people ages 18-25 abuse prescription opioids at a 30 percent higher rate than the national average.  In just five ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: The Hillman Of Bihar

In the year of our Lord, 1927, there was a very poor child born to a very poor family in a very poor place. His name was Dasrath Manjhi and he was a native of the Musahar community somewhere in India. We know he had no education and, as a member of the lowest Hindu scheduled castes, he didn’t have a cut dog’s chance from the very get go. But after spending considerable time in ... (click for more)