Paying Another Visit to Tony Papa's Confectionary, with Tokens to Spend

Sunday, June 29, 2014 - by Harmon Jolley/Tom Carson

On several Memories articles, Tom Carson, a friend and fellow enthusiast of Chattanooga history, has either given me the lead for the story or contributed additional material.

 

I recently received an e-mail from Tom in which he reported finding some tokens related to a Memories article which included information on the Tony Papa Confectionary .

  The link to the original article is

http://www.chattanoogan.com/2004/2/15/46825/z/Sports/Schedules-and-Scores.aspx.

 

The following are Tom's comments on the historic tokens that he purchased.

 

In about 2010, I purchased a copy of the "Tony Papa, Good for 10 cts with return of bottle" token, Tokens without a city or state are referred to as mavericks. I did a Google search and found this article by Harmon Jolley.

 

This identified the token. I did another search and found the grandson of Mr Papa who gave me his grandfather’s phone number. Mr. Papa was in his late 90s and told me a little about his business at that location and told me that somewhere he had a bag of the old tokens.

 

In the spring of 2014 I got another Tony Papa token and set it aside. The other day I had the opportunity to take a closer look.

 

The token was a few millimeters smaller and was In Trade. This caused me to search for Mr. Papa and I found that he died on April 3, 2011 at 100 years of age. (token information from Tom Carson tcarson@ewkm.net).

 

If you have additional information on Tony Papa, please send me an e-mail at jolleyh@bellsouth.net.  

 

It has been a while since I have been by the former Tony Papa Confectionary.  Could someone update me on its current owner/tenant?   As Tom noted, the building was constructed when Boyce was the name of the lower end of Chestnut Street.

 

 

 


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