Georgia Supreme Court Declines To Hear Case Brought By Street Vendor Outside Turner Field

Monday, June 30, 2014

Today, the Georgia Supreme Court refused to hear Stanley Hambrick’s appeal in which he sought to have himself and other street vendors to return to Turner Field.

 

Now it is up to Mayor Kasim Reed and the Atlanta City Council to decided whether or not to change their vending laws to allow the dozens of street vendors and their employees who previously worked outside of Turner Field, to again sell outside the stadium.

 

Three days before opening day in 2013, Atlanta officials forced all vendors off the streets. In response, Hambrick sued and the Fulton County Superior Court ordered the officials to accept vending applications and issue permits. When those officials refused to obey that court order, Hambrick asked the court to find those officials in contempt and recognize Atlanta street vendors’ right to return to work. The court denied those motions and Hambrick appealed.

 

“For almost an entire month Atlanta’s officials refused to follow an order requiring them to let the vendors return to work,” said attorney Robert Frommer of the Institute for Justice, which represents the vendors. “It is unfortunate that the Georgia Supreme Court chose not to take this opportunity to protect both the vendors’ constitutional rights and the rule of law.”  

 

Although the Court’s decision today brings a close to Hambrick’s lawsuit, it opens a new chapter in the fight for Atlanta’s street vendors, attorney Frommer said. Katrina Taylor Parks, deputy chief of staff for Mayor Reed, told the Atlanta City Council that the administration was planning to bring vending back to Turner Field but that the ongoing litigation was keeping it from moving forward.

 

“For over a year, Atlanta’s baseball vendors have been unable to provide for themselves and their families by working at their traditional locations,” said Larry Miller, president of the Atlanta Vendors Association. “The Atlanta Vendors Association looks forward to working with the administration to end this stalemate and bring sidewalk vending back to The Ted.”  

 


Harrison Sparks Lookouts To 3-2 Win Over Smokies

For the second straight night Travis Harrison delivered in the clutch for the Chattanooga Lookouts. Tonight the third baseman drove in all three runs in the team's 3-2 win over the Tennessee Smokies before a crowd of 4,765 at AT&T Field. Harrison kicked off his night in the third inning with an RBI single to bring home Zack Granite who reached on a walk. Chattanooga ... (click for more)

PHOTOS: CFC Suffers 2-1 Steinbrecher Cup Overtime Loss

Large Hole Develops In Lane Of I-24 Eastbound Over Chestnut Street; Emergency Repair Undertaken

 A large hole developed in the I-24 eastbound bridge over Chestnut Street in Chattanooga on Sunday evening. Jennifer Flynn of TDOT said, "The hole is such that we are having to close a lane to protect traffic.  This will cause a significant backup in traffic, especially given the holiday.  "This is the same bridge, but different location that we recently did ... (click for more)

12 Lost Hikers Rescued At Rainbow Lake, Edwards Point

Eleven adults and a child were briefly lost at Rainbow Lake and Edwards Point trails on Signal Mountain on Sunday. A 911 call was made at 9:45 p.m. from one of the hikers reporting the group lost sunlight hiking out of the trails at Edwards Point. Th Signal Mountain Fire Department and the Walden's Ridge Emergency Services have responded to the scene to ... (click for more)

Parking Discrimination Downtown

Many taxpayers who reside in Chattanooga (but outside Chattanooga's core) feel left behind when it comes to neighborhood paving, sidewalks, policing, streetscaping, street sweeping, public transportation, and other services. Some think most tax dollars are spent on downtown and not in their neighborhoods. It's not as if they can't vicariously experience the largesse of downtown. ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: One Nameless Ghost

One hundred years ago the United States was at war. The most intense fighting during World War I was on what was called The Western Front. The Germans wanted to invade France from the north and in order to do it, they had to push through Flanders province in Belgium. It has been described as a hell unequalled in raw hand-to-hand combat, In just four months on Flanders fields, ... (click for more)