DNR Offers $1,000 Grant For Conservation Teacher

Wednesday, June 04, 2014

The Nongame Conservation Section of the Georgia Department of Natural Resources is offering a $1,000 grant to a third-, fourth- or fifth-grade public or private school teacher in Georgia who demonstrates exceptional energy and innovation in teaching life sciences. 

This opportunity is possible thanks to support from the Environmental Resource Network, friends group of the Nongame Conservation Section.

Through education, research and management, the Nongame Conservation Section works to safeguard Georgia's native diversity of wild animals, plants and their habitats – while also striving to increase public enjoyment of the outdoors. The purpose of the grant is to recognize and help an outstanding teacher who uses Georgia’s nongame wildlife as the context for learning third-, fourth- or fifth-grade curriculum standards, according to Linda May, DNR environmental outreach coordinator. 

“Students who learn about plants, wildlife and habitats often develop an appreciation for these diverse natural resources and are then motivated to be good stewards of the environment – not just during childhood but also as adults,” said Ms. May,  who works with the Nongame Conservation Section.

Nongame wildlife refers to native animals that are not fished for or hunted and rare plants not harvested, such as gopher tortoises and Georgia aster. 

Previous grant recipients fostered a love of Georgia’s natural heritage and taught students how to contribute to healthy ecosystems through their everyday actions. For example, at Rocky Branch Elementary in Watkinsville, teacher Shawna Babin and third-graders explored soils, plant adaptations and habitat types using worm farms and greenhouses.

More recently, students at Whit Davis Elementary in Athens created Georgia-specific habitats with representative animals in aquariums for the school’s science laboratory, all with guidance from science specialist Steven King and the University of Georgia’s Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources. Students observed the aquarium activity and recorded findings in a journal and through videos broadcast on the school’s district cable TV channel. 

This fall, another teacher will be selected to receive funding based on project design and how well the grant proposal questions are answered. Projects that are especially creative and teach about Georgia’s rare or endangered species, as well as those that can’t be funded otherwise, will earn bonus points. See www.georgiawildlife.com/TeachingConservationGrant for details.

The deadline to apply is Sept. 15. DNR will notify the grant winner and award funding in October. 

The Nongame Conservation Section is part of DNR’s Georgia Wildlife Resources Division.

For more information about this DNR grant opportunity, contact Ms. May (linda.may@dnr.state.ga.us, 706.557-3226) or Anna Yellin (anna.yellin@dnr.state.ga.us, 706.557-3283). 

TEACHING CONSERVATION GRANT/AT A GLANCE
 

$1,000 grant to a Georgia third-, fourth- or fifth-grade public or private school teacher who demonstrates exceptional energy and innovation in teaching life sciences. 

Provided by Georgia DNR’s Nongame Conservation Section and The Environmental Resource Network, the section’s friends group. 

Deadline to apply is Sept. 15. Recipient announced in October.

For more: www.georgiawildlife.com/TeachingConservationGrant or contact Linda May (linda.may@dnr.state.ga.us, 706.557-3226) or Anna Yellin (anna.yellin@dnr.state.ga.us, 706.557-3283).


Fall Offers Great Trout Fishing Opportunities In Georgia

Are trout streams calling you to go fish Georgia?  Beautiful weather and fantastic scenery await you in the northern part of the state and beginning on  Nov. 1 , fishing on five delayed harvest trout streams will open, according to the Georgia Department of Natural Resources’ Wildlife Resources Division. Trout streams are designated either seasonal or year-round.  ... (click for more)

Governor Haslam Dedicates Trail At Pogue Creek Canyon State Natural Area

Governor Haslam joined staff from the Tennessee Division of Natural Areas, Tennessee State Parks and the Tennessee Parks and Greenways Foundation last Friday to dedicate a new trail at Pogue Creek Canyon State Natural Area. “Tennessee has incredible natural areas that offer something for everyone, and this partnership will help protect and preserve these lands for future generations ... (click for more)

Downtown Chattanooga Apartment Complex Fetches $15 Million

Walnut Commons, the first downtown apartment complex built in many years, sold for $15 million, one of the developers said. John Clark said the initial estimate on the project was $11 million and it wound up costing around $12 million to build. "We're very pleased with the sale," he said. Mr. Clark, along with partners David Hudson and Bob McKenzie, are selling their stock ... (click for more)

Hamilton County Principal Ronald Hughes Named Tennessee's 2014-15 Principal Of The Year

A Hamilton County elementary school principal and an Anderson County supervisor have earned top honors for their work in Tennessee education. Ronald Hughes, principal of Apison Elementary School in Chattanooga, was named Tennessee’s 2014-15 Principal of the Year. He has served as principal at Apison Elementary for the past six years, and spent three decades working in Tennessee ... (click for more)

Congratulations To Ron Hughes

Hearty congratulations to Ron Hughes for being selected as Tennessee State Elementary Principal of the Year for 2014. Wherever Ron has been assigned as principal, he has exhibited strong leadership both academically and morally. His faith in God and his love for the students of Hamilton County have guided his actions and everyone that has benefited from the excellent education ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: Brittany’s Days Dwindle

So here we are, facing what is known as “Devil’s Night” before Halloween comes, and the almost macabre news now comes that Brittany Maynard, the beautiful girl who has chosen to end her life as soon as Saturday, is struggling to meet her own deadline. She has inoperable brain cancer and, at best, only months to live. The 29-year-old, who was married shortly before her devastating ... (click for more)