Dalton State Remains One Of The Most Affordable Colleges In The Nation

Thursday, July 10, 2014
Dalton State College SOAR leader Montana Gray, left, speaks with incoming freshmen about several topics of concern by the new students, including financial aid and affording school, during the College’s new student orientation recently. The College remains one of the most affordable public four-year schools in the nation.
Dalton State College SOAR leader Montana Gray, left, speaks with incoming freshmen about several topics of concern by the new students, including financial aid and affording school, during the College’s new student orientation recently. The College remains one of the most affordable public four-year schools in the nation.

Dalton State College continues to be one of the most affordable four-year colleges in the nation, according to the U.S. Department of Education.

This is the fourth consecutive year Dalton State has been placed on the list for the lowest net price, which is the average cost of college attendance for full-time students after grants and scholarships are taken into account. Dalton State is among the top 10 percent of public four-year colleges with the lowest net price. It ranks 26 on the list.

The ranking is based on the 2012-2013 academic year, the latest data available from the U.S. Department of Education’s College Affordability and Transparency Center.

Dalton State’s students had an average net cost of $4,562 for that school year. The national average was $11,582. That figure includes not only tuition and fees, but also other costs associated with being a college student, such as books, supplies, room and board, and transportation.

“We are thrilled to be named once again to the Department of Education’s list of most affordable four year colleges and universities,” said Dr. John O. Schwenn, president of Dalton State. “It is critically important to us to keep a Dalton State education within the economic grasp of most families in the Northwest Georgia region.”

“Even more important to us than low cost however is the rich student experience we offer at Dalton State,” he said. “With facilities such as Peeples Hall for teaching and learning, with sophisticated equipment made available to students such as that provided by the Mashburn Charitable Trust, with opportunities for undergraduate student research that are second to none, with nationally recognized faculty, and vibrant student life opportunities that expand and strengthen each year, we are convinced Dalton State offers the best value in college education anywhere in the country. The fact that we can offer that rich experience with such a low price tag makes it even better.”

Dalton State’s current tuition and fees for a student taking 15 credit hours a semester are $3,910 per year. Students pay less than $100 per credit hour in tuition.

Eighty-three percent of Dalton State’s students receive some form of financial assistance. The College processed $12.5 million in federal grants last year. Students received approximately $6.5 million from the HOPE program. And scholarships from the Dalton State College Foundation and outside donors totaled more than $500,000.

“While continuing to offer quality academic programs, we strive to keep Dalton State College accessible and affordable for our students,” said Jodi Johnson, vice president for Enrollment and Student Services. “With the majority of our population receiving need-based assistance, it is important for students to recognize they are getting an excellent educational value. Being able to direct students and families to the Department of Education's website, and pointing out our continued presence on the list of institutions with the lowest net price, provides proof of the value of a Dalton State degree.”

The lists are released annually using data collected by the National Center for Educational Statistics through the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System.

“These lists support our efforts to make college more accessible and to help families make informed decisions on the single most important investment students can make in their own futures,” said U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan. “Empowering students and families with this information is critical to reaching President Obama’s 2020 goal for America to once again have the highest proportion of college graduates in the world.”


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