History Center Presents Stand Up Paddleboard History Tour

Saturday, July 12, 2014

The Chattanooga History Center, in cooperation with L2 Boards, will present a new program, "Paddle through the Past: Chattanooga's Story."

Be a true pioneer and get a unique perspective on Chattanooga’s story.  Riding the river under your own power, you will get in touch with the environment that has attracted people to the area for thousands of years.

You will examine clues offered by the contemporary landscape to watershed moments in the past. You will even find out how Chattanooga became a place where people would want to participate in outdoor activities like this totally cool tour

The tour will last one hour and begin at 9:00amon Saturday, August 2nd.  The History Center's Senior Educator, Caroline Sunderland will serve as tour guide. Registration is required by Friday,August 1st and space is limited.

The fee is $25 for members of the Chattanooga History Center and$35 for non-members, which includes board rental and life jackets.

The tour will meet at L2Boards at 100 Market Street and depart from, and return to, Ross’s Landing, with Veteran’s Bridge as its turn point. Experienced and novice standup paddlers are welcome, and so are experienced and novice history enthusiasts.

Contact Senior Educator Caroline Sunderland for registration at caroline.sunderland@chattanoogahistory.org or 265-3247, option 1.


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