Mountain Beautiful Trail Re-Opens On Lookout Mountain Battlefield

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park is advising a portion of the Mountain Beautiful Trail that closed in January, 2012 is now open for public use.

The park, in partnership with the Southeast Youth Corps, developed a project to construct a reroute of a section of the Mountain Beautiful Trail that was severely damaged by a rock fall. The portion of trail that was damaged was on the northeast end of the trail where it began traversing downslope from the bluff to the Lookout Mountain Conservancy’s Hardy Trail.

This new section of trail will allow the public to experience the Mountain Beautiful Trial without going near the rock fall area. 

This was the first partnership with the Southeast Youth Corp. and Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park and was very successful. The crew consisted of six people with two work leaders who built 984 feet of new tread and cleared 8,289 feet of corridor along the Upper Truck Trail. 

The park looks forward to continuing a successful partnership with the Southeast Youth Corp. in the future.

The Mountain Beautiful Trail is on the east side of Lookout Mountain, and traverses the mountain side north and south starting at the junction of the Hardy Trail and Mountain Beautiful Trail and continues north until it connects at the intersection with the Bluff Trail just below Point Park.

For more information about the trails at Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park, contact the Chickamauga Battlefield Visitor Center at 706 866-9241, the Lookout Mountain Battlefield Visitor Center at 423 821-7786, or visit the park’s website at www.nps.gov/chch.


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