Tennessee Valley Railfest Brings History To Life

Friday, August 1, 2014
The Tennessee Valley Railroad Museum is celebrating its 4th annual Tennessee Valley Railfest on Sept. 6-7, at the Grand Junction Depot off Jersey Pike in Chattanooga. The weekend event is a salute to railroading history with unique excursions and family fun.
 
"Railfest is a wonderful family event and a unique chance to visit the museum and have an experience we don't typically offer," said Steve Freer, TVRM spokesperson.  "We have live demonstrations, shop tours, train rides to East Chattanooga and even an excursion to Chickamauga, Georgia available this year," he added.
 
 
Tennessee Valley Railroad Museum has been in operation for 53 years and created the event as a birthday celebration, but Railfest has expanded to become an event designed to immerse the visitor in living history.  Live entertainment for Railfest includes folk & country, featuring the Lawmen on Saturday and jazz, highlighted by the 9th Street Stompers on Sunday. The daily admission fee is $20 adults and $15 children (3-12).  For a $17 up charge you can take an excursion train to Chickamauga on Saturday at 10 am returning at 4:30 pm. The Chickamauga Turn ticket gets visitors free entry into Railfest either day.  Children of all ages will enjoy the Missionary Ridge Steam excursions, petting zoo, children's activities, miniature train exhibits, roving magician, inflatables, and unique food. Parking is free on site. Hours for Railfest are Saturday, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., and Sunday, 10am-6pm.
 
Overnight packages are available through the Chattanooga Choo Choo Hotel and can be booked online at choochoo.com.  The TennesseeValley Railroad Museum is the Southeast's largest operating historical museum whose mission is to preserve railroading history for future generations.  Visit online at tvrail.com or call 423 894-8028 for tickets and information for Railfest and other year round trips.

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