U.S. Xpress Announces Pay Raise, New Pay Structure For Solo Truck Drivers

Tuesday, August 12, 2014

U.S. Xpress, a provider of transportation services across North America, announced Tuesday that the company has taken a leadership position among national carriers by increasing the base mileage pay for Over the Road solo, non-dedicated truck drivers by an average of 13 percent, effective Aug. 25.  U.S. Xpress implemented this pay raise and other compensation changes to ensure the company continues to recruit and retain the industry’s elite, most qualified drivers, said officials.

“The trucking industry has and will always remain the lifeblood of the U.S. economy," said Max Fuller, chief executive officer for U.S. Xpress.  "More important, our industry needs to celebrate professional, career drivers and better reward them for the hard work they do day in and day out to safely deliver freight on time and without incident.  Drivers are the ones who ensure that our store shelves are not empty, manufacturing does not grind to a halt and our economy does not stall.”

Mr. Fuller continued, “At U.S. Xpress, we understand the importance of what these drivers do every day and the value they provide to our company and for our customers.  By increasing the base mileage pay by an average of 13 percent for our non-dedicated, OTR solo truck drivers, U.S. Xpress is taking a monumental step to becoming the carrier of choice for safe, career-minded professional truck drivers.”

In addition to increasing the base mileage pay, U.S. Xpress will also eliminate the sliding pay scale for all OTR solo drivers based on feedback from its current driver population.  For many, the sliding pay scale made it difficult for drivers to calculate their base pay from week to week.  Starting on Aug. 25, U.S. Xpress will implement a simpler pay structure where all OTR solo drivers will earn the same base mileage pay regardless of the length of haul that they are running for the company.   

U.S. Xpress made these changes to the pay structure for OTR solo driver because the company continues to identify new, emerging business opportunities with its strategic customers, most of which will be supported by OTR solo drivers.  By making this investment today, U.S. Xpress will be in a better position to attract more professional, elite drivers that will help the company meet this emerging demand for its shipping services and ensure the company continues to grow as one of the leading providers of transportation services, said officials.

According to company officials, nearly every facet of the country depends upon some type of goods or services that were delivered by a professional truck driver. In fact, a recent report from the American Trucking Associations stated that approximately 70 percent of the freight shipped annually in the United States was delivered by a truck driver.  This means more than three million professional truck drivers are transporting more than 9.2 billion tons of freight by driving approximately three million heavy-duty, Class 8 trucks.  

Mr. Fuller continued, “With more goods and services being shipped by trucks, we need to expand the workforce so our industry has better trained, more qualified drivers that can take better care of our customers.  This is why U.S. Xpress wants to lead the way on this issue as well as show our commitment to recruiting and retaining experienced, customer focused and safety-conscious drivers. These professional, elite drivers are essential to U.S. Xpress and ensure our company can safely deliver freight on schedule while meeting the unique requirements of our customers.”

For more information, truck drivers can visit www.usxjobs.com or contact U.S. Xpress at 866.576-2979.


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