Lee's Woolfitt Receives Plattner Award, Nemerov Scholarship

Friday, August 15, 2014
Dr.  William Woolfitt
Dr. William Woolfitt

Dr.  William Woolfitt, assistant professor of English at Lee University, has won the Appalachian Heritage Plattner Award in Fiction for his short story "Daughter with a Star on Her Brow.” 

According to Dr. Woolfitt, “Daughter” takes place in the coal mining town of Monongah, W.Va., shortly before the 1907 explosion that has been called the worst mining disaster in American history. It examines the lives of two immigrant families, one Polish and the other Italian, those whose stories are sometimes obscured by the historical record.

Kenneth and Elissa May Plattner established the Denny C. Plattner Awards in 1995 to honor their late son, Denny, and his love for writing. The awards are presented to the finest pieces of fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry that appeared in the magazine during the previous year. 

“Past winners have included outstanding Appalachian writers like Sharyn McCrumb, Ann Pancake, and Maurice Manning,” said Dr. Woolfitt, “so I am very honored to have my work chosen for a Plattner Award.” 

Dr. Woolfitt was also awarded the Howard Nemerov Scholarship in Poetry to attend the 2014 Sewanee Writers’ Conference, hosted by the University of the South last month.

“I also feel very honored and humbled to have been selected for a scholarship at Sewanee,” Dr. Woolfitt said. “The conference provides 11 days of workshops, readings, craft lectures, and editor presentations, and it truly is an enriching, emboldening experience.”

Dr. Woolfitt joined Lee’s Department of Language and Literature in fall 2012, where he teaches creative writing and American literature.

He is the author of two chapbooks: “The Salvager’s Arts” (poetry), co-winner of the Keystone Prize; and “The Boy with Fire in His Mouth” (fiction), winner of the Epiphany Editions contest. The title story of “The Boy with Fire in His Mouth” is based on Woolfitt’s travels in Uganda and will appear in the Everywhere Stories anthology, scheduled to be published on Oct. 1. 

“Beauty Strip,” Dr. Woolfitt’s first full-length book of poems, will be published on Sept. 15, while “Charles of the Desert,” Dr. Woolfitt’s second full-length book of poems, has been accepted by Paraclete Press and will be published in 2016.

Dr. Woolfitt’s poems and stories appear in such publications as Shenandoah, Michigan Quarterly Review, The Threepenny Review, Notre Dame Review, New Ohio Review, The Cincinnati Review, Hayden’s Ferry Review, Ninth Letter, and River Styx, among others.

 

In addition to teaching and writing, Dr. Woolfitt has hiked a thousand miles of the Appalachian Trail and canoed the Chibougamau lake system in central Quebec; he explores the back roads of West Virginia whenever he can.

For more information about the Everywhere Stories anthology, visit http://cliffordgarstang.com.   

To pre-order “Beauty Strip,” visit http://www.amazon.com/Beauty-Strip-William-Kelley-Woolfitt/dp/1680030108.

For a complete listing of the 2013 Plattner Awards winners, visit https://www.facebook.com/appalachianheritagemagazine/posts/10152087419001512.

Chattanooga State Students Create ‘Green Alternative’ Solar Recharging Stations

“A collective team effort between faculty, staff, and students resulted in the creation of a solar recharging station that stands ready to provide a renewable energy source for Chattanooga State students. It serves as a ‘green’ alternative to charge or power their phones, laptops, tablets, and other personal devices,” said Tim McGhee, dean, Engineering and Information Technologies. ... (click for more)

Causeway, Community Foundation Come Together To Fund New Parent-Focused Education Projects

The Community Foundation of Greater Chattanooga has partnered with Causeway to fund two  parent-focused education projects, the Orchard Knob Middle School Back to School Bash, and Essential Spark, an after-school arts and culture program for pre-K children and their parents. Both projects were finalists in the Causeway Challenge, which asked community members to submit ... (click for more)

Blakemore, Corbett, Rachels Charged In Red Bank Heroin Death

Three Chattanooga residents have been charged with distribution of heroin that led to the death of an individual in Red Bank in February. Authorities have cited a recent rise in heroin abuse in the Chattanooga area, causing several overdose deaths, including three in one recent weekend.   A federal grand jury on Tuesday returned a superseding indictment charging ... (click for more)

Teen Shot Multiple Times On 4th Avenue; 2nd Youth Shot Twice On Pinewood Avenue; Woman Shot Twice On 25th Street

A teen was shot multiple times on 4th Avenue on Monday night. The victim was 19-year-old JaMarcus Davis. A second teen, 18-year-old Jaylain Ballard, was shot twice early Tuesday morning on Pinewood Avenue. Marion Heard, 45, was shot twice early Tuesday morning on 25th Street. In the first incident, Chattanooga Police responded at 7:20 p.m. to the area of the 2600 block ... (click for more)

General Bell: Chattanooga Needs The Coolidge Medal Of Honor Heritage Center - And Response (7)

I'm pleased and indeed compelled to let you know a bit more about the exciting and most honorable "Charles H. Coolidge Medal of Honor Heritage Center" planned for Coolidge Park.     Here's what the Heritage Center will be:  It will be a fitting capstone for Chattanooga's Coolidge Park on Northshore in downtown Chattanooga.  While this exceptional Chattanooga ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: What You Leave Behind

Randy Travis, one of the best at singing country songs that has ever been, had a song about three people who got killed when an 18-wheeler missed a stop sign. There was a farmer and a teacher, a hooker and a preacher on this bus and Randy tells us: “One's headed for vacation, one for higher education, An' two of them were searchin' for lost souls.” In that wonderful song, the ... (click for more)