150th Anniversary Of A Confederate Railroad Raid On Cleveland Observed

Monday, August 18, 2014
Brenda Ramsey, standing, represented Sarah Smith, a union supporter who was among those evacuated from Cleveland during the raid. Shana Haynes, waits to read Myra Inman's diary entries about the raid.
Brenda Ramsey, standing, represented Sarah Smith, a union supporter who was among those evacuated from Cleveland during the raid. Shana Haynes, waits to read Myra Inman's diary entries about the raid.

The 150th anniversary of a Confederate railroad raid on Cleveland was observed Sunday by a crowd that filled the old Cleveland depot.

Bryan Reed, president of the Bradley County Historical and Genealogical Society, said this Cleveland encounter between Union and Confederate forces was part of a larger, unsuccessful Confederate raid through Tennessee attempting to distract General Sherman who was approaching Atlanta. The event ended with the booming of a cannon placed on Fort Hill Cemetery that could be heard across downtown.

Sunday's program included several people who dressed in period uniforms and dresses and read from the writings of those who took part in the raid or were affected by those Cleveland events.

The observance was one of many over the past four years marking Civil War events that happened in Cleveland. Melissa Woody, tourism vice-president of the Cleveland/Bradley Chamber Of Commerce, said the final 150th anniversary event will be in October, 2015. In October, 1865, Cleveland held a city barbecue to mark the end of the war.

There is one more Civil War-related event this year. The annual Fort Hill Cemetery walk, on Oct. 20, will feature local actors in period dress standing beside the graves of some local personalities from 150 years ago. They will tell modern visitors how the war affected their lives.

Since 2011, the annual Fort Hill walks have featured local Civil War era families. The renovated depot building where Sunday's event was held was not the Civil War era depot. The building was constructed early in the 20th Century then renovated in recent years to house the city bus service offered by the Southeast Tennessee Human Resources Agency.

Author Of ‘The Final Season: The Perseverance Of Pat Summitt’ To Hold Book Signing

Knoxville author Maria M. Cornelius, who wrote “The Final Season: The Perseverance of Pat Summitt,” will hold a book signing at Star Line Books, 1467 Market St., No. 106,from 4-6 p.m. today. Ms. Cornelius, a writer and editor for Moxley Carmichael, began working on the book three years ago after signing a contract with The University of Tennessee Press. The book was released ... (click for more)

River Gallery Has Opening Reception For November Exhibit Nov. 4

The River Gallery November exhibit will feature Christina Goodman, Scott Hill and Tracy Sharp.  The opening reception will be Friday, Nov. 4, from 6:30-8 p.m.  The artists will be present at the reception.    Review for the artists:     Inspired by the Renaissance period, Christina Goodman creates precious treasures ... (click for more)

Domestic Assault Charge Dismissed Against Bobby Stone In Case Involving Mayor's Top Advisor; Stone Says Berke Had Inappropriate Relationship With His Wife; Says Berke And Fletcher Conspired To Arrest Him

A charge of domestic assault was dismissed Friday morning against Bobby Stone in a case involving a top advisor to Mayor Andy Berke.  Afterward, Mr. Stone told reporters that the mayor had an inappropriate relationship with his wife, Lacie Stone. He also charged that Mayor Berke and Police Chief Fred Fletcher conspired to arrest him. Mr. Stone is expected to file ... (click for more)

Christopher Padgett Taken Into Custody

A Chattanooga man who went on the lam after cutting off his ankle monitor and failing to show up for the third day of his felony murder trial is back in custody. Christopher Padgett was arrested by Chattanooga Police in the 3200 block of South Street at 12:55 a.m. He had made a $350,000 bond just before the start of his trial in the slaying of taxi driver Nathan ... (click for more)

Literacy Is Critical

Government spending is often portrayed as a freight train "quickly running out of track." And there is some truth to that statement. There is not an endless supply of money to fund every good idea that comes along, and we must acknowledge that problem. Fiscal responsibility is a must.  That is why spending on priority issues like public education is important. You can spend ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: Prayer Over Despair

As a strong proponent of early voting, I joined hundreds at the Hamilton County Election Commission headquarters on Amnicola Highway yesterday to exercise what I consider one of our greatest freedoms – “for the people, by the people.” Candidly, I have never been as upset or as disappointed over my choices for President in my life. Locally I am fine with our candidates but to pick ... (click for more)