Tahere To Perform At Lee Tuesday

Friday, August 29, 2014
David Tahere
David Tahere

David Tahere, baritone, will perform a recital on Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. in the Squires Recital Hall, located in the Humanities Center on Lee’s campus. 

The evening’s performance will center on music of America and feature works by Virgil Thomson and Aaron Copeland. Mr. Tahere will be accompanied by Susan Hadden.

A Lee alum and a native of Davenport, Iowa, Mr. Tahere’s credits in opera include Sam in “Trouble in Tahiti,” Malatesta in “Don Pasquale,” Ramiro in “l’Heure Espangole,” Le Gendarme in “Les Mamelles de Tiresias,” and Saint Peter in “Too Many Sopranos,” among others.

Mr. Tahere has been a featured soloist with the Mendelssohn Club of Philadelphia, Philadelphia Chamber Chorus, Chattanooga Choral Arts Society, Chattanooga Bach Choir and Tenth Concert Series under the baton of highly regarded directors, Andrew Altenbach, Teri Murai, Cristian Marcelaru, Alan Harler, and Helmuth Rilling. He was a studio artist with The Opera Theatre and Music Festival with Cincinnati Conservatory of Music in Lucca, Italy, where he studied Italian and the performance of Puccini.

Mr. Tahere serves as an assistant professor of voice at Covenant College, where he teaches applied voice, acting for singers, vocal pedagogy, diction, and musical style. He received his Master of Music in voice performance from Temple University and his Bachelor of Music in voice performance from Lee University. He currently studies with Zurich Opera’s Reinaldo Macias.

The recital is free and open to the public.

For more information, please call the School of Music at 614-8240.

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