Crabtree Farms’ 12th Annual Fall Plant Sale & Festival Is Saturday

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Free and open to the public, Crabtree Farms’ 12th Annual Fall Plant Sale & Festival will once again offer gardeners the healthiest, sustainably-grown fruit, vegetable, flower, and herb plant starts for their fall gardens, officials said.It will be Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 1000 E. 30th St.

Guests can attend free gardening workshops, shop for arts and crafts, and enjoy bluegrass music provided by the Tin Cup Rattlers.

Not only will there be an abundance of Crabtree Farms’ plant starts for sale, local craft vendors will be onsite with handcrafted goods, including bar soap from 423 Soaps, all-natural dog treats from Barley Bones, handmade jewelry and home décor from Marshall and Rose,  marinades and relishes from Shuptrine’s Twisted,  tinctures from Fireside Botanicals, and herbs from Down to Earth. Food vendors, including Pedal Pusher Coffee Cart, Rusty’s Nutz, and King of Pops will be selling fresh brewed coffee, boiled and roasted peanuts, and artisan popsicles.

The Friends of the Library will be selling farm, garden, and cooking related books to benefit the Public Library. Volunteers will be leading story time for kids throughout the day, and Macaroni Kid will be offering arts and crafts.

 

Workshop Lineup:

10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.: Fall Gardening with Crabtree Farms’ Executive Director, Sara McIntyre

11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.: “Composting: Easy as Dirt” with Master Gardener, Bud Hines

12:00 p.m. to 12:30 p.m.: “5-minute Farmers’ Cheese” with CeCe McDermott of 423 Soaps

1:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.: Kids Yoga, ages 3-6, with Melanie Mayo

1:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.: Kids Yoga, ages 7-12, with Melanie Mayo

All workshops are free and will take place in the barn.




 



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