Meeting on September 17 to Examine Tennessee Nominations to National Register of Historic Places

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

The State Review Board will meet on Wednesday, Sept. 17, 2014, to examine Tennessee’s proposed nominations to the National Register of Historic Places. Beginning at 9 a.m., the meeting will be held at the Tennessee Historical Commission office, Clover Bottom Mansion, located at 2941 Lebanon Road in Nashville.

The Board will vote on 10 nominations from across the state. Those nominations that are found to meet the criteria will be sent for final approval to the National Register of Historic Places in the Department of the Interior. The Board will also look at removing three properties that are listed in the National Register and reducing the boundary of one listed property.

The nominations are:

·        Cocke County: Leadville Coaling Station

·        Davidson County: Archaic Shell-Bearing Sites of the Middle Cumberland River Valley of Tennessee: Barnes Site

·        Davidson County: Grand Ole Opry House

·        Grainger County: Richland

·        Hamilton County: Standard-Coosa-Thatcher Mills

·        Haywood County: Dunbar-Carver Historic District

·        Haywood County: Jefferson Street Historic District

·        Henderson County: Mt. Pisgah Missionary Baptist Church

·        Knox County: Murphy Springs Farm

·        Washington County: Brown Farm

Other business at the meeting will include a review and re-assessment of the H.L. Bruce House in Henry County, the Thomas Williamson House in Rutherford County, the Pinch-North Main Commercial District in Shelby County and the Johnson City Warehouse and Commerce Historic District (boundary decrease) in Washington County.

The State Review Board is composed of 13 people with backgrounds in American history, architecture, archaeology or related fields. It also includes members representing the public. The National Register program was authorized under the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

The public is invited to attend the meeting. For additional information, contact Claudette Stager at 615-532-1550, extension 105, or at Claudette.Stager@tn.gov.

For more information about the National Register of Historic Places or the Tennessee Historical Commission, please visit http://www.tn.gov/environment/history/.  



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