Bicycle Ride Across Tennessee Is Sept. 14-20

Thursday, September 4, 2014

Bicycle enthusiasts across the state are preparing for the annual Bicycle Ride Across Tennessee, which will kick off its 25th year with a seven-day excursion beginning Sept.13, showcasing Middle Tennessee’s beautiful landscapes.

Originating at Tims Ford State Park in Winchester, this year’s route will feature Middle Tennessee’s history, music, horses and distilleries.

This year’s figure eight loop ride visits Tims Ford State Park, Henry Horton State Park, the City of Fayetteville, South Cumberland State Park and Old Stone Fort State Park. The route goes through an area rich in Tennessee history with the opportunity to visit the small towns that make our rural areas so special. The Bicycle Ride across Tennessee offers an excellent sampling of the things that make Tennessee special, and the perfect opportunity to go on a one-of-a-kind bicycle tour.

The event will begin with check-in at Tims Ford State Park at 1 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 13. On Sunday, riders will be introduced to the route with an all-day ride to Henry Horton State Park. The daily mileage will range from 50-70 miles, with approximately 350-410 total miles for the seven-day ride. The cost for the ride is $450 for the seven-day ride and $225 for the three-day ride.

For registration information or more details about the 2014 Bicycle Ride Across Tennessee, visit http://thebrat.org/. Riders with questions are encouraged to contact Ryan Forbess at Ryan.Forbess@tn.gov.   

The Bicycle Ride Across Tennessee (BRAT) is a week-long bicycle tour across Tennessee. The route changes each year, but typically begins in a state park, ending at the same state park. The route is usually a figure eight loop in one of the grand divisions of the state. The tour ends each day in a Tennessee State Park and each host park provides entertainment and food for riders, as well as interpretive programming. In addition, Tennessee State Park rangers offer safety and support along the route. 


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