Author Stacy Reaves To Have Book Signing At The Chickamauga Battlefield Visitor Center

Friday, September 5, 2014

Eastern National, a partner to the National Park Service, invites the public to meet author Stacy Reaves on Saturday, inside the Visitor Center at Chickamauga Battlefield. Ms. Reaves will be available to sign her book, Monuments of Chickamauga National Park from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and will provide a special program at 1 p.m.

Ms. Reaves is a part-time professor of history and geography at Tulsa Community college in Tulsa, Ok.  She has worked as a seasonal ranger for the National Park Service at Shiloh National Military Park in Tennessee and Fort Larned National Historic Site in Kansas.

Ms. Reaves has also served as the curator at Fort Sill and the Military History Museum in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma. She has a BS in historic preservation from Southeast Missouri State University and a Ph.D. in military history from Oklahoma State University.

Ms. Reaves is the author of A History and Guide to the Monuments of Shiloh National Park, A History and Guide to the Monuments of  Chickamauga National Park and a forth-coming book from The History Press on the history of Andersonville Prison Park and Monuments.

The program will discuss the story behind the monuments that dot the Chickamauga and Chattanooga battlefields. The Civil War veterans not only wanted to preserve the battlefields, but they wanted to tell their story and memorialize their losses and success for future generations.  As the men aged and their memories dimmed, they worked with state legislatures to erect monuments. The program will discuss the men who erected the monuments and the sculptors who created the lasting memorials in stone. Ms. Reaves’ program will look at the symbolism and art on the monuments as part of the story and as art. It is Ms. Reaves’ goal to open visitor’s eyes to the monuments and encourage them to read and see the battles thought the eyes of the veterans as told in their monuments.

Military Parks Hold Living History Programs Nov. 5

Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park will hold a special  living history program on Saturday, Nov. 5 about the military preparations at Chickamauga Battlefield in 1916 as the nation debated and prepared to enter World War I. Visitors can interact with living historians from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Chickamauga Battlefield Visitor Center, and formal programs will ... (click for more)

Art Exhibition Opens At Townsend Atelier

Townsend Atelier is excited to announce a special new thematic exhibit of artwork by its students and instructors called CIRCLE. The exhibition will open on  Saturday, Dec. 3  during the legendary MainX24, and run through  Dec. 31 . The exhibit is an opportunity to view and collect affordable artwork from some of the area’s best professional and emerging artists.  ... (click for more)

2 Shot On Shepherd Road Tuesday Evening

Two people were shot Tuesday evening on Shepherd Road. Chattanooga Police were dispatched just before  6:30 p.m.   Tuesday,  to a parties shot call in the 1900 block of Shepherd Road.   Upon arrival, police were told two injured parties were transported to a local hospital via personal vehicle.  Both victims told investigators they were walking ... (click for more)

In Surprise Vote, Chattanooga City Council Turns Down Short Term Vacation Rentals

In a surprise vote, the City Council on Tuesday night turned down allowing a process to legalize short term vacation rentals in Chattanooga. Only Chip Henderson and Jerry Mitchell voted in favor. Opposed were Carol Berz, Yusuf Hakeem, Larry Grohn, Moses Freeman, Ken Smith and Russell Gilbert. Chris Anderson was absent. Afterward, Councilman Smith said, in light of the vote, ... (click for more)

October Is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Picture a sold-out baseball game at Wrigley Field or Nationals Park packed with 40,000 fans. That image represents roughly the same number of women and men who die from breast cancer each year.  In Tennessee alone, an estimated 900 women will die from the disease in 2016. It is a sad statistic, but there is some good news: thanks to early detection and improved treatments, ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: Saving A Life & More

About 40 years ago I was at an afternoon football practice when one of those who was also watching from the fence was bitten by a bumble bee or yellow jacket or whatever it was and almost died from anaphylactic shock. Luckily an athletic trainer had an EpiPen, jammed it into the man’s thigh and it is believed to have saved the victim’s life. For years I kept an EpiPen on the top ... (click for more)