Three Tennessee Sites Added to the National Register of Historic Places

Thursday, December 10, 2015

The Tennessee Historical Commission today announced the addition of three Tennessee sites to the National Register of Historic Places.

“The National Register is an honorary recognition for time-honored places that enrich our communities and make them unique,” Patrick McIntyre, state historic preservation officer and executive director of the Tennessee Historical Commission said. “We hope this recognition helps generate and reinforce an appreciation for these special properties so they can be retained for present and future generations of Tennesseans.

The National Register of Historic Places is the nation’s official list of cultural resources worthy of preservation. It is part of a nationwide program that coordinates and supports efforts to identify, evaluate and protect historic resources. The Tennessee Historical Commission, as the State Historic Preservation Office, administers the program in Tennessee.

Sites recently added to the National Register of Historic Places include:

 English Mountain Fire Lookout Tower

Located near Chestnut Hill in Cocke County, the English Mountain Fire Lookout Tower is a 60-foot tall structure built by the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1934.  The galvanized steel tower is at an elevation of 3,629’ and provided a panoramic view of the surrounding forest. The construction of fire lookout towers in the state at this time reflected the realization that these remote areas, with difficult to traverse land, needed a permanent structure for fire management. The fire lookout tower is important locally for its design and as a representation of the state’s efforts to protect and manage its natural resources.

Kettlefoot Fire Lookout Tower

The Kettlefoot Fire Lookout Tower is in Johnson County in the Cherokee National Forest. Similar to the English Mountain Fire Lookout Tower, the 60-foot galvanized steel tower was erected by the Civilian Conservation Corps around 1936. It has the panoramic square cab and is sited at an elevation of 3,889’. Built by the Aermotor Company of Chicago, the tower has had few changes and retains much historic fabric. The construction of fire lookout towers in the state at this time reflected the realization that these remote areas, with difficult to traverse land, needed a permanent structure for fire management. The fire lookout tower is important locally for its design and as a representation of the state’s efforts to protect and manage its natural resources.

 Chevy Chase House and First Presbyterian Church Complex

The Chevy Chase House and First Presbyterian Church Complex in Jackson is comprised of the 1915 house known as Chevy Chase, the 1953-1957 First Presbyterian Church and Carillon, the 1955-1958 education building, and the historic setting and gates.  The house was built in the Classical Revival style for Clarence and Sarah Pigford, prominent Jackson residents. Around 1951, Sarah Pigford deeded the house to the First Presbyterian Church with stipulations that a memorial carillon be constructed on the property and the house could not be used as a residence.  The carillon was built in 1953 and the church added to it in 1956-1957. Chevy Chase is an excellent representation of Classical Revival architecture in Jackson, as seen in the columned portico, symmetrical form, and interior details.  The First Presbyterian Church is a good example of post-WWII Classical Revival design. The massive columns with stylized capitals, pedimented entry, and interior woodwork show how Classical Revival architecture changed during the first half of the 20th century.



John S. Elder Was Early Settler At Ooltewah

The Elders were among Tennessee's earliest pioneers and were well acquainted with Davy Crockett. John S. Elder and his nephew, Robert S. Elder, made their way to Hamilton County at an early date. The family traces back to Samuel Elder, who in April 1796 paid $200 for 150 acres in the "County of Greene Territory of the United States of America South ... (click for more)

The Elder Mountain Elders

The John Elders were early settlers at Ooltewah. Another family of Elders came to Chattanooga from Trenton, Tn. This family acquired a huge tract on Raccoon Mountain and renamed it Elder Mountain. These Elders included Leander Melville Elder, who was born in 1847 and graduated from Andrew College at Trenton. He then spent three years at the University of Virginia Law School before ... (click for more)

BlueCross Sells Huge Tract Along River For $8.1 Million

BlueCross BlueShield has sold a huge tract along the riverfront in Lupton City for $8.1 million. The purchaser is listed as Riverton LLC., 651 E. 4th St., Suite 403, Chattanooga. BlueCross had bought the 216-acre site in 2001 as a possible site for its corporate headquarters. However, it wound up building a $299 million campus on Cameron Hill instead. BlueCross started ... (click for more)

1 Person Injured In Duplex Fire In East Lake Wednesday Night

One person was injured when fire broke out in a duplex Wednesday night in East Lake. The Chattanooga Fire Department received the alarm at  11:53  p.m. on  Wednesday  and responded to the 4800 block of General Thomas Boulevard with several fire companies. When the first firefighters arrived on the scene, Captain Chris Cordes with Engine 9 said a significant ... (click for more)

Thank You, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Thank you, Dr. King for stepping-out.  Thank you for your lasting voice to what it's all about. Thank you, Dr. King for  stepping up and also showing-up, ...when decisions were being made and  your refusal  to shut-up.  We find your fingerprints on both directions and toward progress.  your modeling, mentoring,  and reactions helps ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: Kids Are Still Funny

I have never seen nor heard of a child actually getting one’s “head pinched off” but by modern-day standards the threat just switched in overdrive. There are children in our communities who haven’t been to school for six long days and the brutal temperatures drove the little darlings to inside where they most predictably stirred up all manner of mayhem. Back when I was in Elementary ... (click for more)