Three Tennessee Sites Added to the National Register of Historic Places

Thursday, December 10, 2015

The Tennessee Historical Commission today announced the addition of three Tennessee sites to the National Register of Historic Places.

“The National Register is an honorary recognition for time-honored places that enrich our communities and make them unique,” Patrick McIntyre, state historic preservation officer and executive director of the Tennessee Historical Commission said. “We hope this recognition helps generate and reinforce an appreciation for these special properties so they can be retained for present and future generations of Tennesseans.

The National Register of Historic Places is the nation’s official list of cultural resources worthy of preservation. It is part of a nationwide program that coordinates and supports efforts to identify, evaluate and protect historic resources. The Tennessee Historical Commission, as the State Historic Preservation Office, administers the program in Tennessee.

Sites recently added to the National Register of Historic Places include:

 English Mountain Fire Lookout Tower

Located near Chestnut Hill in Cocke County, the English Mountain Fire Lookout Tower is a 60-foot tall structure built by the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1934.  The galvanized steel tower is at an elevation of 3,629’ and provided a panoramic view of the surrounding forest. The construction of fire lookout towers in the state at this time reflected the realization that these remote areas, with difficult to traverse land, needed a permanent structure for fire management. The fire lookout tower is important locally for its design and as a representation of the state’s efforts to protect and manage its natural resources.

Kettlefoot Fire Lookout Tower

The Kettlefoot Fire Lookout Tower is in Johnson County in the Cherokee National Forest. Similar to the English Mountain Fire Lookout Tower, the 60-foot galvanized steel tower was erected by the Civilian Conservation Corps around 1936. It has the panoramic square cab and is sited at an elevation of 3,889’. Built by the Aermotor Company of Chicago, the tower has had few changes and retains much historic fabric. The construction of fire lookout towers in the state at this time reflected the realization that these remote areas, with difficult to traverse land, needed a permanent structure for fire management. The fire lookout tower is important locally for its design and as a representation of the state’s efforts to protect and manage its natural resources.

 Chevy Chase House and First Presbyterian Church Complex

The Chevy Chase House and First Presbyterian Church Complex in Jackson is comprised of the 1915 house known as Chevy Chase, the 1953-1957 First Presbyterian Church and Carillon, the 1955-1958 education building, and the historic setting and gates.  The house was built in the Classical Revival style for Clarence and Sarah Pigford, prominent Jackson residents. Around 1951, Sarah Pigford deeded the house to the First Presbyterian Church with stipulations that a memorial carillon be constructed on the property and the house could not be used as a residence.  The carillon was built in 1953 and the church added to it in 1956-1957. Chevy Chase is an excellent representation of Classical Revival architecture in Jackson, as seen in the columned portico, symmetrical form, and interior details.  The First Presbyterian Church is a good example of post-WWII Classical Revival design. The massive columns with stylized capitals, pedimented entry, and interior woodwork show how Classical Revival architecture changed during the first half of the 20th century.



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