Georgia Trust Seeks Nominations for 2016 Places in Peril

Wednesday, May 6, 2015

The Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation is seeking nominations for its 2016 list of 'Places in Peril,' an annual accounting of the state's 10 most endangered historic places. The list is designed to raise awareness about Georgia's significant historic, archaeological and cultural resources, including buildings, structures, districts, archaeological sites and cultural landscapes that are threatened by demolition, neglect, lack of maintenance, inappropriate development or insensitive public policy.

The submission deadline is Monday, June 8; the list will be announced in October. 

Criteria:

Historic properties are selected for listing based on several criteria:

  • Sites must be listed or eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places or the Georgia Register of Historic Places.
  • Sites must be subject to a serious threat to their existence or historical, architectural and/or archaeological integrity.
  • There must be a demonstrable level of community commitment and support for the preservation of listed sites.

How to Nominate a Site: 
Please visit www.GeorgiaTrust.org for a nomination form. Additional information about past 'Places in Peril' sites can also be found on our website. Nominations must be postmarked or e-mailed no later than Monday, June 8.

Sites that have been placed on previous years' lists have included: Glenridge Hall in Sandy Springs, which was demolished in April 2015; the DAR Building/Craigie House in Atlanta, which collapsed during a 2014 ice storm; Travelers Rest in Toccoa, a state-owned site that received  a grant from the Terrell Family Foundation to further its restoration; the Chattahoochee Park Pavilion in Gainesville, which was restored in 2013; Stilesboro Academy in Bartow County, which received a grant from Rollins Ranch, LLC for restoration work; the Cowen House in Acworth, which was sold and rehabilitated through The Georgia Trust's Revolving Fund program; the Wren's Nest, home of folklore writer Joel Chandler Harris in Atlanta, which has undergone extensive restoration since its 2007 listing; Bibb Mill in Columbus, which was destroyed by fire just weeks after it was placed on the 2009 list; Andalusia in Milledgeville, which received a Preservation Award from the Trust in 2013 for restoration of the Hill House located on the property; Old Hawkinsville High School in Pulaski County, which won a Preservation Award from the Trust in 2011; and Mary Ray Memorial School in Coweta County, which received a Preservation Award from the Trust in 2012.

 

Founded in 1973, the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation is one of the country's largest statewide, nonprofit preservation organizations. The Trust is committed to preserving and enhancing Georgia's communities and their diverse historic resources for the education and enjoyment of all.

 

The Trust generates community revitalization by finding buyers for endangered properties acquired by its Revolving Fund and raises awareness of other endangered historic resources through an annual listing of Georgia's 10 "Places in Peril." The Trust helps revitalize downtowns by providing design and technical assistance in 102 Georgia Main Street cities; trains Georgia's teachers in 63 Georgia school systems to engage students in discovering state and national history through their local historic resources; and advocates for funding, tax incentives and other laws aiding preservation efforts.

 

To learn more about The Georgia Trust and the 'Places in Peril' program, visit www.georgiatrust.org

  

 



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