Civil War Historical Marker Ceremony To Be Held June 20 In Cleveland

Monday, June 1, 2015
The latest Civil War-related historical roadside marker will be dedicated during a special ceremony next month in Cleveland. The marker commemorates the difficult time during the Civil War when much of Bradley County lay between Union and Confederate lines. During this period, homes and businesses were vandalized and robbed by both pro-Union and pro-Confederate forces who took advantage of the prevailing lawlessness.
 
This marker also commemorates the courageous actions of War of 1812 veteran Joseph Lusk II, who at 73, defended his home with determination against a group of outlaws attempting to steal his mules.
He shot and killed one of the group and, soon after, his home was burned in retaliation. The marker is being installed at the site where Mr. Lusk’s home once stood.
 
Those invited to attend are Sam Elliott, immediate past chairman, Tennessee Historical Commission, Jim Ogden, chief historian, Chickamauga-Chattanooga National Military Park, Mary Ann Peckham, executive director, Tennessee Civil War Preservation Association, Dr. Bryan Reed, history professor and chair of the Humanities department, Cleveland State Community College, Melissa Woody, vice president, tourism, Cleveland/Bradley County Chamber of Commerce.
 
The event will be on Saturday, June 13, at 2 p.m. at 7723 Dalton Pike, S.E., Cleveland, Tn. 37323.
 
This event is free and open to the public. 


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