Kayak Tour of Chattanooga's History June 27

Tuesday, June 16, 2015

The Chattanooga History Center will partner with Outdoor Chattanooga to a kayak
tour on the Tennessee River on June 27, 2015 beginning at 8:30 am. Join us for a leisurely, beginner-friendly kayak tour and be a true pioneer and get a unique perspective on Chattanooga’s story.

Riding the river under your own power, you will get in touch with the environment that has attracted people to the area for thousands of years. You will examine clues offered by the contemporary landscape to watershed moments in the past. You will even find out how Chattanooga became a place where people would want to participate in outdoor activities like this totally cool tour.

Registered participants meet at the Outdoor Chattanooga for a leisurely two-hour paddle around
Maclellan Island led by experienced Outdoor Chattanooga river guides. Chattanooga History Center
Senior Educator, Caroline Sunderland, will tell the stories of how people have interacted with the river that runs through our city and through our city’s history. You will view historic photographs from the CHC Collection and learn history in the context of the modern landscape.

Cost for the tours is $45 per adult and $35 for kids ages 14-18. All kayaking equipment and guides are included. Reservations are required and must be secured with a credit card to insure a spot. Space is limited. To make a reservation, call Outdoor Chattanooga at 423-643-6888.


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