Young Scholars Converge on Nashville for Tennessee History Day April 9

Wednesday, April 6, 2016

After months of intensive research and successes at local and district level competitions, 250 students from all parts of Tennessee will present their projects at the annual Tennessee History Day competition, which will be held in downtown Nashville on Saturday, April 9 at the War Memorial Auditorium, Tennessee Tower, Legislative Plaza, and Nashville Public Library.

In the competition, middle and high school students create projects related to historical themes. The projects may be exhibits, documentaries, websites, performances or research papers.

The students whose projects are judged best in Saturday's competition will be eligible to participate in National History Day, which will be held in College Park, Maryland from June 12 through June 16. There, they can compete for national awards and scholarships. 

“This stellar group of students advanced from more than 7,000 sixth- through 12th-graders who participated in History Day this year,” said Ann Toplovich, executive director of the Tennessee Historical Society. “The students, along with their teachers and families, can already take pride. Their thorough research, critical thinking skills and high quality projects will make judging tough for the next round of winners at the state contest.”

Nationwide, the program annually engages more than a half million students in grades six through 12 from all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Guam, American Samoa and Department of Defense Schools. Each fall, students and teachers nationwide begin work on the year-long curriculum, which starts with competitions held in individual schools.

The winners advance to district competitions. In Tennessee, those district competitions take place in Knoxville (sponsored by the East Tennessee Historical Society), Greeneville (sponsored by Tusculum College), Clarksville (sponsored by Austin Peay State University), Murfreesboro (sponsored by Middle Tennessee State University) and Memphis (sponsored by the University of Memphis).

The district winners qualified for Saturday's event, which will be held at several buildings in downtown Nashville. Tennessee History Day is sponsored by the nonprofit Tennessee Historical Society, thanks to grant support from the Tennessee Secretary of State’s Office and Humanities Tennessee.

"History Day presents wonderful opportunities for students to develop important skills that will serve them well not only in school, but throughout their lives," Secretary of State Tre Hargett said. "I've had the pleasure of meeting a number of History Day participants through the years and I've come away inspired by the hope they represent for our future. They may be documenting history now, but it won't be long before some of them will be making history."

Tennessee History Day allows participating students to learn by researching their own topics using primary source documents. Each year's topics must be based on a specific theme. This year’s theme is Exploration, Encounter and Exchange. While all projects must relate to the theme, students are encouraged to use their creativity.



Brooks Family Was Among Earliest Settlers Of Sale Creek

Joseph Brooks was one of the earliest settlers at Sale Creek when it was part of Rhea County. Three of his nieces along with their husbands were Hamilton County pioneers. Joseph Brooks and his brother, Moses Brooks, were sons of John Brooks, who was born in Ireland about 1730. He made his way to Philadelphia and lived a short time in Pennsylvania before going with the tide of ... (click for more)

Hundreds Of Students To Compete In Tennessee History Day Contest

Nearly 300 students from across Tennessee will compete in the annual Tennessee History Day state contest in downtown Nashville on  Saturday . The competition allows students to showcase their creativity and research skills by developing projects with historical themes. The students with the best-judged projects in the statewide competition will advance to the National ... (click for more)

Walker Sentenced To 4 Years In State Prison For Tragic Woodmore Bus Wreck

Johnthony Walker was sentenced to four years in state prison on Tuesday in connection with a school bus crash that claimed six lives and injured 22 other Woodmore Elementary students. Judge Don Poole declined to run any of the sentences consecutively, while finding that the 25-year- old Walker was not a "dangerous offender." Walker has already served almost a year of the sentence ... (click for more)

Pet Raccoon That Was Destroyed Did Not Have Rabies

A pet raccoon that was destroyed in order to test for rabies after biting a neighbor child did not have rabies, Chattanooga attorney Chris Jones. The family has been advised it can pick up the remains of Boomer at the Chattanooga Hamilton County Health Department. Attorney Jones, who specializes in wildlife cases, earlier argued there was no valid reason for health ... (click for more)

Set Up A Council On Love, Not A Council On Hate - And Response

In Mayor Berke's April 19 version of the Berke Bulletin, he announced plans to establish a Council on Hate and indicated a focus on tolerance. I beg of him to reconsider that plan. One problem in Chattanooga and in other places in America is that there are some people who have already established an informal version of a Council on Hate. I suggest that a more productive plan ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: Corker And ‘The Code’

Of all the vows, pledges, and bonds born unto the human race, nothing overrides “The Code.” It is an unwritten but deeply important knowledge that men should abide with equal respect, fierce loyalty, and chivalrous understanding of one another. For example, The Code dictates you must not and can never date a good friend’s ex-girlfriend, or ex-wife. Rather, you respect your friend ... (click for more)