‘High Impact Practices’ Translate To Student Success Dalton State Says

Tuesday, August 23, 2016
Pictured are, front row from left, Dr. Barbara Tucker, chair of the Department of Communication and a professor of communicatio; Dr. Marina Smitherman, associate professor of biology and director of the Center for Academic Excellence; and Elizabeth Lucht, assistant professor of biology; second row from left are Dr. Brian Hibbs, assistant professor of Spanish and Stephani Womac, assistant director of orientation and family programs and interim assistant director for career and professional development
Pictured are, front row from left, Dr. Barbara Tucker, chair of the Department of Communication and a professor of communicatio; Dr. Marina Smitherman, associate professor of biology and director of the Center for Academic Excellence; and Elizabeth Lucht, assistant professor of biology; second row from left are Dr. Brian Hibbs, assistant professor of Spanish and Stephani Womac, assistant director of orientation and family programs and interim assistant director for career and professional development

Five Dalton State faculty and staff members attended the Association of American Colleges and Universities’ High Impact Practices Institute on the campus at UCLA. Dalton State was one of 36 schools selected in a highly competitive process to participate in the prestigious institute, officials said.

Representing the College were Dr. Marina Smitherman, associate professor of biology and director of the Center for Academic Excellence; Dr. Brian Hibbs, assistant professor of Spanish; Elizabeth Lucht, assistant professor of biology; Stephani Womac, assistant director of orientation and family programs and interim assistant director for career and professional development; and Dr. Barbara Tucker, chair of the Department of Communication and a professor of communication.

The group returned from Los Angeles with a plan to phase in multiple high impact practices over the next four years to ensure most graduates experience at least two of them during their time at Dalton State. The team selected service learning, internships, undergraduate research, and study abroad as the practices on which they would focus.

"What if a student who’s never traveled beyond the state line had the opportunity to study abroad in Europe or China? How is learning enhanced for the student who interns with a local business or non-profit? What about the science student who performs original research under the watchful eye of a faculty mentor? These 'high impact practices' serve to engage students in profound ways and provide an enriched college experience, and they are being embraced at a new level by Dalton State faculty and administration," officials said.

“I am extremely proud of and excited about the hard work this dedicated team devoted to developing this innovative and strategic action plan,” said Dr. Smitherman who has spearheaded the movement toward implementing high impact practices at Dalton State. “This plan encourages collaboration between Dalton State personnel as well as local community organizations and business partners in an effort to shape the excellence of our students into productive global citizens.

“These practices require high levels of effort, reflection, and interaction with faculty,” she said. “Research has also shown the high impact practices to be especially effective with under-served populations” which represents the majority of Dalton State students. 

Dalton State’s commitment to expanding and enriching high impact practices coincides with Georgia joining the AAC&U’s Liberal Education and America’s Promise program, a national advocacy and campus action initiative just last month. Georgia is the nation’s 13th LEAP state.
“LEAP champions the importance of a 21st century liberal education – for individual students and for a nation dependent on economic creativity and democratic vitality,” said Dr. Tucker.

Dalton State committed to the LEAP initiative last spring with a positive vote by faculty and staff.

“Both the LEAP initiative and the high impact practices help us achieve the goals of student success and academic excellence set forth in the College’s three-year strategic plan,” said Dalton State President Margaret Venable.




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