Chattanooga State Brings Crappie University To Chattanooga

Wednesday, January 4, 2017
Barry Morrow
Barry Morrow

Chattanooga State Community College is offering a continuing education course with a new hook, literally, for anyone interested in crappie fishing, beginner to avid.

Called Crappie University and taught by a team of expert crappie-fishing instructors, the 8-hour course encompasses four two-hour night classes and costs $89 per person. The enrollment fee covers all course materials, including samples of crappie lures and jig heads.  

Crappie University will be held on Mondays, Feb. 6, 13, 20, and Wednesday, March 1. Class times are 7:30-9:30 p.m., and all four classes will be held at on the main campus located at 4501 Amnicola Highway, Chattanooga. 

“Crappie fishing is no longer just a cane pole and bobber sport, and the pursuit of this sport fish has never been more popular,” said Crappie University’s founder Gary White. “Across the country, the crappie is gaining on bass as the number one sport fish. Crappie University is not a seminar, it’s an accelerated course in the strategies and techniques for becoming a better crappie angler. Our instructors are the best-of-the-best on their respective topics.” 

With the advent of several crappie fishing tournament trails, new and unique ways to catch the species under a variety of conditions are constantly being found and refined. Each Crappie University instructor has a technique he relies on most when the fishing gets tough. From spider rigging and long lining, to dock shooting, pushing crankbaits and other specialty techniques, the course instructors will share their knowledge on how they find and catch crappie. A question-and-answer session is included each night.

“It has been said that 90 percent of the fish are in 10 percent of the water. While that may not be true in every instance, these instructors know exactly where to find the crappie in every season of the year. They are crappie pros and guides who have developed their techniques through trial and error,” said Mr. White.

Crappie University instructional staff includes Barry Morrow, “the crappie coach.” A retired school superintendent and wrestling coach, Mr. Morrow is now a full-time crappie guide in Oklahoma and Missouri. He has been featured on the Sportsman’s Channel and fishes several crappie trails across the country. He has won three Crappie Masters events and is the back-to-back winner of the Missouri State Championship. He is known nationwide for helping coach anglers in the art of crappie “catching.”

Another instructor is longtime Tennessee crappie guide Brian Carper. Brian guides about 200 days a year and is an expert on crappie migration patterns. Also on the instructional staff will be Dan Dannenmueller, publisher of the online magazine, Crappie Now. Dan’s tournament experience led him to win back-to-back Angler of the Year Awards for Bass Pro Shops’ National Crapppie Masters’ Tournament Trail. 

Joining these three will be Lee Pitts, full-time crappie guide, who has been featured on the Southern Legends TV Show, the Sportsmans’ Channel, in Fisherman Magazine and numerous other publications. 

To enroll in the 2017 Crappie University at Chattanooga State Community College, call the campus at 423-697-3100 or register by credit card payment at this online link: http://registration.xenegrade.com/cscc-ce/coursedisplay.cfm?schID=7403

For more information about Crappie University, visit www.CrappieUniversity.com.

Lee Pitts
Lee Pitts


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