AT&T Announces Contribution To The College Of Applied Technology

Friday, October 27, 2017

As part of AT&T’s continuing commitment to supporting quality education across Tennessee, the company has donated $3,000 to the Tennessee College of Applied Technology at Chattanooga State.  The contribution will provide for the purchase of network storage units which help support training for high-skill jobs requiring technology-based skills throughout Tennessee.  The use of the units will prepare students to successfully recover from a mock data disaster and practice implementing recovery plans.

"We are thrilled that AT&T is investing in our students and has recognized that our technical programs bring industry and employment opportunities directly to graduates right here in our own community," said Dr. Jim Barrott, vice president, Technical College at Chattanooga State. “Creating and maintaining a workforce that is ready to meet the needs of our region is critically important and the training supported by this contribution will better equip graduates for success as they begin their careers.”

This donation is part of AT&T’s $81,000 gift to the Tennessee Board of Regents.  Each of the state’s 27 colleges of applied technology will receive $3,000 to support their efforts to provide workforce development through high quality training that is economical and accessible to all residents of Tennessee.

“We have worked hard to create a climate that is welcoming of new business which can be seen in the record growth Tennessee is experiencing,” said Senator Bo Watson. “With this growth comes the need for a high-skill workforce and through programs like those offered at TCAT, graduates will be prepared to succeed in a modern workplace.”

“Technology is creating new jobs and new jobs require new skills. Through this partnership with AT&T and TCAT-Chattanooga, I am confident our graduates will have the necessary skills today’s employers demand,” said Rep. Gerald McCormick.

"To meet the needs of our ever-growing economy, Tennessee’s institutions of higher education must ensure new entrants to the workforce are prepared and obtain the requisite knowledge, skills and abilities to succeed in a modern workplace," said Rep. Patsy Hazlewood. "Through programs like those offered at the Chattanooga College of Applied Technology, pathways are created for non-traditional students to gain these skills, benefiting all Tennesseans.” 

“Success in higher education is critical for Tennessee’s long-term growth and potential,” said Rep. Mike Carter. “Thanks to the programs offered at TCAT-Chattanooga, students receive the real-world training and education that is required to succeed in the 21st century workforce.”

Tennessee’s information technology and technical needs are growing at an exponential rate, creating increased demand for well-trained IT personnel that are crucial to the economic development of Tennessee businesses and industries. 

“As the need for IT personnel surges, the Tennessee Colleges of Applied Technology are helping students develop the critical skills required to enter the workforce and find good jobs right here in Tennessee. We are delighted to support these students on their journey to professional development,” said Dennis Wagner, director of external affairs for AT&T Tennessee.

The 27 Tennessee Colleges of Applied Technology are located in:

Athens

Chattanooga

Covington

Crossville

Crump

Dickson

Elizabethton

Harriman

Hartsville

Hohenwald

Jacksboro

Jackson

Knoxville

Livingston

McKenzie

McMinnville

Memphis

Morristown

Murfreesboro

Nashville

Newbern

Huntsville

Paris

Pulaski

Ripley

Shelbyville

Whiteville

This contribution is part of AT&T Aspire, AT&T’s signature philanthropic initiative to drive student success in school and beyond. More information on AT&T’s Aspire is available at: http://www.att.com/aspire.



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