Dr. Shane Johnston Of Rhea County Completes Superintendents Academy

Tuesday, December 5, 2017

The list of qualified individuals ready to assume the position of school superintendent grew by 14 names this month, including Dr. Shane Johnston, assistant superintendent, of Rhea County, with the successful conclusion of the tenth Prospective Superintendents Academy hosted by the Tennessee Schools Boards Association and the Tennessee Organization of School Superintendents. 

Those who successfully completed the 2017 Prospective Superintendents Academy are:
Garfield Edson Adams, Executive Principal, Oak Ridge Schools
Dr. Beth Batson, Student Services and Policy Supervisor, Cheatham County
Dr. Tracey Beckendorf-Edou, Executive Director of Teaching and Learning, Oak Ridge Schools
Dr. R. Mason Bellamy, Director of Elementary Schools, Clarksville/Montgomery County
Dr. Donald C. Durley, Principal, Millington Municipal Schools
Drayton Hawkins, Director, Sunny Hill Innovative Learning Center, Haywood County
Dr. Tanisha L. Heaston, Principal, Shelby County
Dr. Shane Johnston, Assistant Superintendent, Rhea County
Jeffrey W. Jones, Chief of Staff, Collierville
Roger Louis Jones, III, Principal, Collierville
Mark Neal, Principal, Shelby County
Dr. Donna Singley, Principal, Campbell County
Dr. Christy D. Smith, Supervisor of Elementary Education, Hardeman County
Lewis G. Walling, Supervisor of System Data, Robertson County 

According to TSBA, which conducts numerous superintendent searches in Tennessee, the state faces a shortage of candidates who are prepared to lead school districts. Tennessee has a critical need for a preparatory program for prospective superintendents. 

Created in 2007 to address this need, the Academy provides 16 days of training designed to help those with experience in such fields as education, business, military, government or public service acquire the unique knowledge and skills necessary to manage a school system. Courses were taught by educational leaders from across Tennessee, and sessions covered subjects including school finance, school law, board relations, technology, personnel, and facilities management. 

“We are very pleased with the quality of the candidates who completed the course this year,” said TSBA Executive Director Tammy Grissom. “A dynamic, innovative and highly-skilled superintendent is crucial to the success of any school system, and based on what we have seen over the past year, we believe these 14 individuals have the tools to meet that challenge.” 

Upon successful completion of the program, candidates receive certification from the Academy’s independent review board consisting of educators and business leaders. Evaluation of candidates was based upon work product, class participation, and a final oral presentation and interview. 

The Tennessee School Boards Association, a statewide nonprofit organization founded in 1939, is a federation of the state’s school boards. It serves as an advocate for the interests of Tennessee’s public school students and school districts and provides in-service training and technical assistance for the more than 950 board of education members in Tennessee. 

The Tennessee Organization of School Superintendents is an advocate organization for public education in the State of Tennessee. Since 1975, TOSS has been progressing public education and addressing the needs of the state’s school administrators.

Click here for the 2018 Prospective Superintendents Academy schedule & brochure.



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