Mike Croxall: Multigenerational Households Continue Strong Growth

Thursday, April 27, 2017 - by Mike Croxall, president, Home Builders Association of Greater Chattanooga

After increasing dramatically during the Great Recession, the formation of multigenerational households shows no signs of slowing down. In fact, a record 60.6 million people lived in multigenerational homes in 2014, according to a Pew Institute analysis of census data.

This means that nearly 20 percent of the U.S. population lives in households consisting of two or more adult generations. There are many reasons for this trend, reflecting both economic realities and cultural preferences.


The recession caused many adult children to return home after college, either because they weren’t able to get jobs that would cover rent, or they wanted to save up to buy homes of their own. Significantly, living with parents was the most popular housing option for adults ages 18 to 34 in 2014, according to the Pew Institute.

For many ethnic and immigrant groups, multiple generations of a family living together is a common cultural custom. The country’s growing Asian and Hispanic populations helps contribute to the formation of multigenerational households, too.

However, Pew research shows that multigenerational households are increasing in popularity with nearly all racial groups, as well as all age groups and with both men and women.

Multigenerational households also form so that grandparents can help take care of their grandchildren, and as they age, their children can care for them. This type of arrangement can ease financial burdens as well, with several generations contributing to the mortgage payment and not having to incur the expenses of childcare, retirement housing or professional care-giving environments.

Home builders and remodelers in the Chattanooga area are building and renovating homes to meet the needs of multigenerational households. These designs allow many generations of the same family to live together under one roof yet have private areas as well as combined living space.

Features of multigenerational home plans can include in-law suites within the main home with separate areas for independent living. These often have kitchenettes and en suite bathrooms, and sometimes private entrances from the street. They frequently include "universal design" features and products, which focus on maximum usability by people of all ages and abilities. Examples include wider hallways, walk-in showers, smooth flooring transitions, and cabinets with pull-out drawers.

Building professionals who have earned the National Association of Home Builders’ Certified Aging-in-Place Specialist (CAPS) designation have received training on how to build or renovate a home so that the occupants can live in the home safely, independently and comfortably, regardless of their age or mobility level. They have been taught the strategies and techniques for designing and building aesthetically pleasing, barrier-free living environments. While most CAPS professionals are remodelers, an increasing number are general contractors, designers, architects, and health care professionals.

To learn more about multigenerational home plans or to find a Certified Aging-in-Place Specialist in Chattanooga and surrounding areas visit Home Builders Association of Greater Chattanooga at HBAGC.net or go to nahb.org/capsdirectory. 



Developers Sought For Former Coats American Property In Walker County

The Walker County Development Authority (WCDA) moved forward with plans this week to put the former Coats American property in Rossville on the market. The WCDA issued a Request for Proposals (RFP) from area business leaders and others to purchase the eight acre site. In addition to submitting a monetary offer, potential buyers should describe their plans for the property, ... (click for more)

Nathan Walldorf Of Herman Walldorf & Co., Inc. Earns The Seller’s Representative Specialist Designation

Nathan Walldorf of Herman Walldorf & Co., Inc. earned the Seller’s Representative Specialist (SRS) designation on Saturday, after completing the 12-hour SRS course work.  The SRS designation, recognized by the National Association of Realtors, is the premier credential in seller representation. It is designed to elevate professional standards and enhance personal performance. ... (click for more)

City's Top Traffic Reconstruction Expert: "Man, This Truck Just Creamed A Dozen Cars"

The Chattanooga Police Department's top traffic reconstruction expert testified Tuesday that when he first viewed the scene of an horrific crash at the Ooltewah exit he thought "Man, this truck just creamed a dozen cars." Officer Joe Warren told a jury from Nashville that, according to his calculations, Benjamin Scott Brewer was traveling at 81-82 miles per hour when he struck ... (click for more)

Taji Webb, 26, Shot And Killed Monday Night; Shooter Will Not Be Charged

Taji Webb, 26, was shot and killed Monday night. Police said they have determined that the shooting was justified and the unidentified shooter would not be charged.   The Chattanooga Police Department responded at 10:43 p.m. to a person shot call in the 1500 block of Ryan Street .  Upon arrival, officers located Webb lying on the ground suffering from a gunshot ... (click for more)

General Bell: This Government Shutdown Is Outrageous - And Response (3)

The day before yesterday two Army Apache Attack Helicopter pilots were killed in a crash during training at Fort Irwin, Ca.  The pilots and their unit were preparing for a future deployment to combat operations.    As a result of the government shutdown, none of the spouses or families of these pilots will receive a dime from the United States Government in immediate ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: Making A Difference

It was about 50 years ago when the late writer Loren Eiseley penned an essay called “The Starfish Thrower” so it’s been one of my favorite stories for almost as long. It tells about a man who walks up to a young boy on a beach, this just after a strong storm had washed hundreds of helpless starfish onto the shore. The boy was picking up the stranded starfish and, one at a time, ... (click for more)