Physicians, Community Leaders Honored For Service At TMA Annual Meeting

Sunday, April 30, 2017
David Bruce, MD of Chattanooga; Adele Lewis, MD of Nashville and John W. “Jack” Lacey III, MD of Knoxville received TMA’s Distinguished Service Award
David Bruce, MD of Chattanooga; Adele Lewis, MD of Nashville and John W. “Jack” Lacey III, MD of Knoxville received TMA’s Distinguished Service Award

The Tennessee Medical Association recognized the service of physicians, community leaders and other organizations promoting a healthier Tennessee at its 2017 Awards Luncheon in Nashville on Saturday. The awards were presented at a ceremony during the annual meeting of the TMA House of Delegates.

TMA’s Distinguished Service Awards have been presented by the association since 1963 to recognize TMA physician members for notable achievements during the course of a year. This year’s Distinguished Service Award Winners are: Dr. David Bruce, MD of Chattanooga, Dr. John W. “Jack” Lacey III, MD of Knoxville, and Dr. Adele Lewis, MD of Nashville.

Dr. Bruce was honored for his volunteer work as medical director of the Chattanooga IRONMA race.  Dr. Bruce and his team of more than 100 medical professionals work tirelessly to ensure the event is as safe as possible, and last year saw almost 700 athletes in the medical tent during the course of the race.  

Dr. Lacey was honored for his work as medical director of the Knoxville Academy’s Projec Access to start a new program called KAPA Connects. The program will work to connect patients with local services that can help fill important needs including transportation, food and shelter.

Dr. Lewis was honored for her leadership with the Nashville Academy of Medicine as th academy experience significant growth. Between 2014 and 2016, NAM membership grew from 1,460 to more than 2,100. Dr. Lewis served as chair of the NAM Board of Directors in 2016 following a two-year term as president.

TMA’s Community Service Awards, presented since 1976, recognize the contribution of physicians and organizations who advance the overall public health and well-being of their communities. Community Service Awards were presented to Appalachian Mountain Project Access, La Paz Chattanooga and Regina Mullins, resident manager and outreach director for the Magdalene Residential Program at Thistle Farms in Nashville.

Appalachian Mountain Project Access has assisted more than 5,400 residents of Northeast Tennessee with urgent, emergent or chronically unstable healthcare needs since opening its doors in 2007. It has connected residents with more than $50 million in donated medical care.

La Paz Chattanooga has become a gateway for healthcare services for the Latino population o Hamilton County since it was established in 2004. It provides translation services and health related programming including prenatal screenings, nutrition classes and an annual health fair. 

Regina Mullins was among the first women to go through the Thistle Farms program for womenwho had survived prostitution, addiction and human trafficking. She has since dedicated her life to helping other women overcome addiction and human trafficking, including launching the Magdalene Arms outreach project in 2003 to help women on the street.

Brooks Blair, executive director of Appalachian Mountain Project Access; Jessica Cliche and Executive Director Stacy Johnson of La Paz Chattanooga; and Regina Mullins of Thistle Farms accepted Community Service Awards from TMA
Brooks Blair, executive director of Appalachian Mountain Project Access; Jessica Cliche and Executive Director Stacy Johnson of La Paz Chattanooga; and Regina Mullins of Thistle Farms accepted Community Service Awards from TMA


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