Tennessee Health Care Hall Of Fame Announces 2017 Inductees

Tuesday, May 2, 2017
With a mission to honor men and women who have made significant and lasting contributions to the health and health care industries, the Tennessee Health Care Hall of Fame announced the six health care professionals selected as the Hall of Fame’s 2017 class at a luncheon on Belmont University’s campus Tuesday. Created by Belmont University, the McWhorter Society, and founding partner the Nashville Health Care Council, the Hall of Fame will induct these individuals at a ceremony in October. 
 
President of the Nashville Health Care Council Hayley Hovious said, “This impressive group of inductees represents some of our state’s greatest talent.
With individuals from all across Tennessee who have made a significant impact on their communities through their work as leaders, politicians, practitioners, scientists, philanthropists and innovators, the Hall of Fame is honored to induct such a deserving group of health care heroes.”
 
The nomination process began in January and was open to practitioners, executives, entrepreneurs, mentors, teachers, scientists, researchers, innovators, or any person with a connection to the health or health care field. Nominees must have: 
• Been born, lived, or have worked in Tennessee;
• Made a significant impact and lasting contribution to health care at the local, state, national, or international level;
• Exhibit the highest ethical and professional character; and
• Serve as an outstanding role model in their community.

"Among the more than 30 highly qualified nominees, inductees were chosen by a selection committee made up of health and health care leaders from across the state. Selected inductees represent some of Tennessee’s greatest health and health care pioneers, leaders, and innovators," officials said.
 
The 2017 inductees include: 
•         Dr. Dorothy Lavinia Brown: first African American female surgeon in the south, TN House of Representative and General Assembly member, longtime educator and chief of surgery at Riverside Hospital and clinical professor of surgery at Meharry, Advocate for women’s health, rights, and education;
•         Dr. William “Bill” Frist: former U.S. senator and majority leader, Vanderbilt Transplant Center founder, first heart and lung transplant surgeon at Vanderbilt, founder of Hope Through Healing Hands and NashvilleHealth, senior fellow at the Bipartisan Policy Center;
•         Joel Gordon: 47-year health care veteran who introduced physician ownership/joint ventures as a business structure, founder of GeneralCare and Surgical Care Associates, co-founder of HealthWise of America, owner of Gordon Group Investment Management;
•         Dr. Harry Jacobson: physician, entrepreneur, and investor who founded/co-founded eight companies, past chair of the Nashville Health Care Council board of directors, executive-in-residence at Belmont University’s Jack C. Massey College of Business, past vice chancellor for Health Affairs at Vanderbilt University and former CEO of Vanderbilt University Medical Center;
•         Dr. Stanford Moore:  received the Nobel Prize for chemistry in 1972 for his work with proteins and their composition which led to the first understanding of the complete chemical structure of protein and ultimately informed decades of scientific work surrounding disease and drug discovery; graduate of the University School of Nashville and Vanderbilt University 
•         Dr. Donald Pinkel: first director and CEO of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital; and received the Lasker Award for Medical Research, Kettering Prize for Cancer Research and Pollin Prize for Pediatric Research; led the development of the first treatment for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, increasing the cure rate from four to 50 percent. 
 
In addition to recognizing Tennessee’s most influential health and health care leaders, The Hall of Fame will serve as an on-going educational resource to document the rich history that has contributed to Tennessee’s position as a leader for national health care initiatives. 
 
Belmont’s President Dr. Bob Fisher said, “One of the things I am incredibly grateful for is Belmont’s placement in Tennessee – a state that is widely recognized as a central hub for health care in the United States, with Nashville at the helm. Our community continues to see the efforts of so many as individuals and organizations take significant strides towards shaping and advancing the health and health care industries. Meanwhile, Belmont continues to play an increasingly significant role in undergraduate, graduate and executive health care education. The induction of these six health care legends, and those that will come after them, will help Belmont inspire the next generation of health care greats, while further promoting our state’s booming success as the nation’s premiere health care hub.”
 
Created in 2015, the Hall of Fame has previously inducted 14 members including Jack Bovender, Dr. Stanley Cohen, Dr. Colleen Conway-Welch, Dr. Thomas Frist, Jr., Dr. Thomas Frist, Sr., Dr. Henry Foster, Dr. Ernest Goodpasture, Dr. Frank Groner, Jack C. Massey, R. Clayton McWhorter, Dr. David Satcher, Dr. Mildred Stahlman, Dr. Paul Stanton and Danny Thomas.



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